August 7, 2008

Pt 1: Women's Health Care in Newfoundland - When the only three gynecological oncologists working in Newfoundland and Labrador all tendered their resignations last week, health advocates shuddered. The province was already reeling from the Cameron Inquiry's revelations of botched breast cancer testing. And that combination of events has led some women to question the provincial government's commitment to women's health. In the mean time, the specialists' decision to pack up their practices in October has left as many as 1,200 female cancer patients in Newfoundland and Labrador wondering how they're going to get the care and treatment they need.

Read more here

Pt 2: Iraqi Doctors - Over the last five years, hundreds of Iraqi doctors have fled their country leaving behind their homes and medical practices to seek safety and security abroad. The result is an enormous brain drain that's left Iraq with a severe shortage of physicians, specialists and other medical professionals.

Read more here



Satire

It's Thursday, August 7th.

A military commission in Guantanamo found Osama Bin Ladin's driver guilty.

Currently, an appeal of the sentence has already been submitted by the Torah Borah taxi driver's union.

This is the Current.


Women's Health Care in Newfoundland

When the only three gynecological oncologists working in Newfoundland and Labrador all tendered their resignations last week, health advocates shuddered. The province was already reeling from the Cameron Inquiry's revelations of botched breast cancer testing. And that combination of events has led some women to question the provincial government's commitment to women's health. In the mean time, the specialists' decision to pack up their practices in October has left as many as 1,200 female cancer patients in Newfoundland and Labrador wondering how they're going to get the care and treatment they need.

Kathleen Connor is one of them. She received treatment for ovarian cancer at the Bliss Murphy Cancer Care Foundation and she joined us from St. John's. Kathleen isalso running for the NDP in a provincial by-election.

Concerns of a Failing System

Losing all of its gynecological oncologists would be a major blow to Newfoundland and Labrador's health care system. But for Michelle Murdoch, it's not the only way the system is failing its female patients. She's a board member with Newfoundland and Labrador's Provincial Advisory Council on the Status of Women and she also joined us from St.John's.

And Michelle Murdoch isn't the only one who thinks there's a more systemic problem at work in Newfoundland and Labrador. Here's how Lorraine Michaels, the provincial NDP leader, diagnoses the situation.

Health Remedies

However you diagnose the problem, Ross Wiseman is the person left with the task of fixing it. He's Newfoundland and Labrador's Health Minister and he joined us from Bangor, Maine.



Listen to Part One:

 

Iraqi Doctors

Over the last five years, hundreds of Iraqi doctors have fled their country leaving behind their homes and medical practices to seek safety and security abroad. The result is an enormous brain drain that's left Iraq with a severe shortage of physicians, specialists and other medical professionals.

Between 60 and 70 per cent of the country's registered medical specialists have left. There are now only nine thousand doctors working in Iraq. That's six doctors for every ten thousand people. And the Iraqi Government says that over the last five years, at least 176 of the doctors who did stay have been killed.

But officials in Baghdad say that's all about to change. The Government has begun offering big incentives to lure back some of the doctors who left. And according to Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari, more than 100 doctors have already returned.

Practicing in Canada


But Nabil Mammo isn't convinced yet. He was an eye surgeon in Baghdad before he and his family fled to Canada. He now works as an optometrist in Mississaugua, Ontario. He joined us in Toronto.

As you heard earlier, the Iraqi Health Ministry has persuaded more than a hundred doctors to return to Iraq. But the problems with the country's health care system go well beyond a shortage of doctors. Marion Birch is the Director of the British charity Medact. She's been monitoring the state of Iraq's health care system as well as the efforts to improve it. She joined us from London.


Listen to Part Two:

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