August 4, 2008

Pt 1: Foot Traffic - Even if the price of gas is in the stratosphere, the car is still king in North American cities. The exception is typically on weekends, when some neighbourhoods declare themselves no-car zones and turn the pavement over to pedestrians. Some of the busiest roads become streets for strollers and boulevards for buskers. Safe havens for foot traffic.

Read more here

Pt 2: Alooktook Ipellie - Alooktook Ipellie moved in a lot of different circles. So when the celebrated Inuit artist and writer died suddenly last fall in Ottawa at just fifty-six years of age, it was felt by a lot of people from art critics to the bartender at his favourite pub.

Read more here



Satire

It's Monday, August 4th.

British Columbia is assessing the state of the Sea to Sky Highway, which just reopened after being closed by a rock slide last week. The International Olympic Committee awarded the 2010 Olympics to Vancouver-Whistler partly because of a pledge that the highway would pose no problems during the Games.

Currently, Vancouver Olympic officials are wishing they'd promised something the IOC wouldn't be so concerned about,like improving human rights in China.

This is the Current.


Part 1: Foot Traffic

Even if the price of gas is in the stratosphere, the car is still king in North American cities. The exception is typically on weekends, when some neighbourhoods declare themselves no-car zones and turn the pavement over to pedestrians. Some of the busiest roads become streets for strollers and boulevards for buskers. Safe havens for foot traffic.

But now, more and more cities are creating spaces catering exclusively to pedestrians. Montreal is one of them.Over a dozen blocks of Sainte-Catherine Street, the city's main artery, were converted in late June into a pedestrian-zone until the fall.

The CBC's Marika Wheeler went for a walkabout through the new pedestrian zone this weekend. And she asked some Montrealers about making the transition to a walker's world.

For more on that city's efforts to make itself more pedestrian-friendly, I'm joined by Patrick Lejtenyi. He's the News editor for the weekly newspaper, the Montreal Mirror, and he's in our Montreal studio.

For two other perspectives of similar attempts to make urban centres more pedestrian-friendly we've reached two other guests. Stephen Quinn is a civic affairs reporter for CBC Radio in Vancouver. And Christopher Hume is the Urban Issues columnist for the Toronto Star. He joined us from Madoc, Ontario.




Listen to Part One:

 

Alooktook Ipellie

Alooktook Ipellie moved in a lot of different circles. So when the celebrated Inuit artist and writer died suddenly last fall in Ottawa at just fifty-six years of age, it was felt by a lot of people from art critics to the bartender at his favourite pub.

Academics say his work is the most significant created by a modern Inuit author. His friends just called him Al. But the dualities of his rich and often troubled life went beyond the rarefied world of high culture and drinks down at the corner bar. They also spanned the Inuit North he left behind and the big Canadian city where he made his mark.

Fiona Christiensen is a CBC reporter based in Iqualit, Nunavut, and she prepared a documentary about Alootook Ipellie's work, life and death. It's called The Two Worlds, and it first aired on the Current in February:


Listen to Part Two:

Comments are closed.