July 24, 2008

Pt 1: A New Age Noah's Ark - According to The Book of Genesis, when a Great Flood threatened every creature on the planet, a prophet named Noah took a cue from God, built a giant boat, and saved most of the animals from extinction. No need to bring up unicorns here.

Read more here

Pt 2: Taking Back the Bikes - Yes, many of us DO love our bicycles. So when it's ripped away, it stings.

Read more here



Satire

It's Thursday, July 24th.

Serbs are still getting over the shock of discovering that accused war criminal Radovan Karadzic was hiding in Belgrade and working as an alternative health practitioner.

Currently, although come to think of it, there was always something a little "off" about his cleansing regimes.

This is The Current.


A New Age Noah's Ark

According to The Book of Genesis, when a Great Flood threatened every creature on the planet, a prophet named Noah took a cue from God, built a giant boat, and saved most of the animals from extinction. No need to bring up unicorns here.

These days, global climate change threatens the survival of up to 30 per cent of animal species on the planet. So an international group of biologists is calling for a dramatic, almost Noah-like intervention to save them. It's called "assisted colonization." Put simply, it involves taking endangered species out of their habitats and re-locating them to territories where they're more likely to thrive.

Camille Parmesan is one of the people advocating the idea. She's an Associate Professor at the University of Texas who co-authored a paper on assisted colonization in the latest edition of the journal, "Science." She joined us from Texas.

Despite the urgency of the situation, the very idea of assisted colonization still strikes some scientists as naive and ill-conceived. Professor Anthony Ricciardi joined us in conversation about the issue. He is an Invasive Species Biologist at McGill University in Montreal.

When Assisted Colonization and Comedy Unite

Now all this talk of re-locating species, raises some important and interesting questions. But the mechanics of actually doing it kind of boggled the minds of our colleagues over at CBC Radio's Comedy Factory. And just so you know, no animals -- endangered or otherwise -- were harmed in the making of this segment.


Listen to Part One:

 

Taking Back the Bikes

Yes, many of us DO love our bicycles. So when it's ripped away, it stings.

For many Toronto cyclists, Igor Kenk was a guy you either knew, or knew about. Igor's bike shop was a clutter of used and abused, rusted and busted bicycles. Hundreds, literally hundreds of bikes filled every crack and corner of his shop, spilling out into the backyard and even onto the sidewalk. It was a place to go for a decent second hand bike or a quick repair job. But suddenly, Igor Kenk has some explaining to do.

Police arrested him and another man last week in what could be the biggest bike theft bust in the country. To date, more than two-thousand bicycles have been recovered from Mr Kenk's various properties throughout the city. Three more rented garages were raided this week, and a thousand more bicycles, even some tricycles, have been recovered.


Gearing Up for a Movement


Bike Registry Canada says over 200 thousand bikes disappear every year across the country. With numbers like that, no wonder there's a movement getting in gear to keep our bikes safe from theft in some of Canada's biggest cities.

Suzanne Anton is a city councillor in Vancouver and we reached her in Duncan BC.

Glenn DeBaeremaeker is a city councillor in Toronto. Both also regularly bike to work.


Listen to Part Two:

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