July 22, 2008

Pt 1: Karadzic Captured - For 13 years, Radovan Karadzic had topped the list of the world's most wanted war crime suspects. This week in Serbia, came the surprise announcement that he had finally been captured.

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Pt 2: Therapeutic Effects of Magic Mushrooms - 50 years ago, before fans of Jimi Hendrix and The Grateful Dead were dropping LSD for fun, a thriving community of researchers was exploring the clinical uses of hallucinogenic drugs. Then came Timothy Leary, his brash personality and his questionable research skills. Before you could say "turn on, tune in, drop out," the field of legitimate study was turned off by authorities who outlawed LSD and other hallucinogens.

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Satire

It's Tuesday, July 22nd.

The contracting firm Blackwater is getting out of the private security business. It says bad press and intense government scrutiny over its role in Iraq have made it impossible to continue.

Currently, By sheer coincidence, the company has also run out of bullets.

This is The Current.


Karadzic Captured

For 13 years, Radovan Karadzic had topped the list of the world's most wanted war crime suspects. This week in Serbia, came the surprise announcement that he had finally been captured.

The United States had put a $5-million dollar bounty on them. The European Union had made it clear their arrest was a condition of joining the European Union.

Radovan Karadzic was the leader of the Bosnian Serbs durning the 1990s Balkan War. He and the Bosnian Serb General Radko Mladic are accused in the slaughter of eight thousand Bosnian Muslim men and boys in 1995, in the UN-protected enclave of Srebrenica.

The streets of Sarajevo bursting into spontaneous celebration when news of the capture spread.

The International Criminal Tribunal at The Hague is expecting Mr Karadzic to be extradited there. Last night he appeared before a Serbian war crimes court. Serbian authorities have released new details of his arrest, and held a photograph of what his latest disguise to the media.

Aleksander Roknic is a reporter with the independent newspaper Danos. He joined us from Belgrade.



Listen to Part One:

 

Therapeutic Effects of Magic Mushrooms

50 years ago, before fans of Jimi Hendrix and The Grateful Dead were dropping LSD for fun, a thriving community of researchers was exploring the clinical uses of hallucinogenic drugs. Then came Timothy Leary, his brash personality and his questionable research skills. Before you could say "turn on, tune in, drop out," the field of legitimate study was turned off by authorities who outlawed LSD and other hallucinogens.

Now a new generation of researchers is exploring the use of these drugs in treating mental disorders. With approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration, there are studies involving magic mushrooms, ketamine and MDMA, the drug commonly made into ecstacy. The latest study, from Johns Hopkins' University, found that the psilocybin in magic mushrooms induced something like a mystical experience, with effects lasting well beyond the initial treatment ... or trip.

Dr. Charles Grob is at the forefront of this research revival. He's an MD and professor of psychiatry and biobehavioural sciences at UCLA and he's studying the therapeutic effects of psilocybin in cancer patients. He joined us from Irvine, California.


Listen to Part Two:

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