April 09, 2008

Pt 1: Pregnant Witness Jailed - When her boyfriend allegedly assaulted her in December 2007, Noelle Mowatt did what you're supposed to: she called the police. But she ended up the one in a jail cell, thanks to a bizarre legal twist that has outraged people who campaign against domestic violence.

Read more here

Pt 2: Turkey and Religion - Back in the early 1920s, Kemal Ataturk had a simple goal: build a secular, democratic country out of the ruins of the Ottoman Empire. The result is modern-day Turkey. But by 2008, his twin goals -- secularism and democracy -- appeared to be in conflict with each other.

Read more here

Pt 3: CBC Radio Two and Classical Music - Mozart will still have a home on CBC Radio Two, but he's going to have to share a bit more of that space. In March 2008, Radio Two attracted the most attention it's had in a long time when it announced that it's shifting its schedule from primarily classical music to a largely Canadian mix of jazz, classical, pop and other contemporary genres, though there will be a daily, five-hour slot from 10 am to 3 pm that's dedicated just to classical music.

Read more here

It's Wednesday, April 9th.

The Federal Court of Canada has ruled that a Nova Scotia distiller cannot call its single-malt whisky "Glen Breton" because the word "Glen" may only apply to whisky made in Scotland.

Currently ... C'mon Scotland. We didn't object when you started calling haggis "food."

This is The Current.


Pregnant Witness Jailed

When her boyfriend allegedly assaulted her in December 2007, Noelle Mowatt did what you're supposed to: she called the police. But she ended up the one in a jail cell, thanks to a bizarre legal twist that has outraged people who campaign against domestic violence.

Noellee Mowatt is 19 years old, nine months pregnant and is being detained at a jail in Milton, Ontario. She's being held there because a judge issued a material warrant for her arrest after she failed to respond to several subpoenas for her testimony at the trial of her boyfriend, 25-year-old Christopher Harbin. He's charged with eight offenses, including breaching probation, forcible confinement and assault with a weapon. Noellee Mowatt has been in jail since April 3, 2008. Her boyfriend's trial is set to begin on Friday, April 11, 2008. She's due to give birth the following Tuesday.

We spoke with Noellee from the Vanier Women's Centre in Milton, Ontario; we were also joined by her lawyer, Lydia Riva.


Pregnant Witness Jailed - Critic

For a look at how the justice system has dealt with this case and the impact it might have on victims of domestic abuse, we were joined in Toronto by Gail Erlick Robinson, a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto and the Director of the Women's Mental Health Program with the University Health Network in Toronto.


Pregnant Witness Jailed - Defender

For his thoughts on the Judge's decision to issue a material arrest warrant in this case, we were joined from Ottawa by David Paciocco, a former Crown Prosecutor and now a Professor of Law at the University of Ottawa.


Listen to Part One:

 

Turkey and Religion - Reporter

Back in the early 1920s, Kemal Ataturk had a simple goal: build a secular, democratic country out of the ruins of the Ottoman Empire. The result is modern-day Turkey. But by 2008, his twin goals -- secularism and democracy -- appeared to be in conflict with each other.

In March, Turkey's Chief Prosecutor appeared before the country's Supreme Court. He accused the governing Justice and Development Party -- also known as the AKP -- of letting Islam creep into Turkey's governing institutions. He also demanded the party be banned. That would mean turfing out all of the AKP's democratically elected parliamentarians, including Turkey's Prime Minister and President, and banning them from politics for five years.

And that's not the only place where battle lines are being drawn. That same month, police arrested several high-profile critics of the government, citing fears that they were part of a secret organization planning a terrorist campaign and possibly a military coup.

Dorian Jones has been keeping tabs on all the mistrust and brinksmanship. He's a freelance reporter based in Istanbul.


Turkey and Religion - Analyst

This is not the first time Turkey has faced a political crisis of this magnitude. In the 1970s and 1980s the country was ravaged by terror from the left and the right. Since 1963, two dozen political parties have been shut down. And the Turkish military has often stepped in to defend the country's secular institutions.

For his perspective on the situation, we were joined from East Lansing, Michigan by Timur Kocaoglu, an Associate Professor of Turkic languages and Central Asian Cultural History at Koc University in Istanbul and a visiting scholar at Michigan State University.


Listen to Part Two:

 

Music

Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer: Danish Radio Orchestra (Adolf and Fritz Busch conducting)
Album: Adolf and Fritz Busch Conduct Mozart
Label: Telefunken
Track: #1: Eine Kleine Nachtmusik (A Little Night Music)


CBC Radio Two and Classical Music

Mozart will still have a home on CBC Radio Two, but he's going to have to share a bit more of that space. In March 2008, Radio Two attracted the most attention it's had in a long time when it announced that it's shifting its schedule from primarily classical music to a largely Canadian mix of jazz, classical, pop and other contemporary genres, though there will be a daily, five-hour slot from 10 am to 3 pm that's dedicated just to classical music.

The announcement elicited a lot of grumbling from Radio Two listeners, some of whom worried that the network was "dumbing down" its programing in the name of mass appeal. But when the announcement came that the 70-year-old, Vancouver-based CBC Radio Orchestra was being mothballed, that was the last straw for many in the classical music community.

Colin Miles, the British Columbia Regional Director of the Canadian Music Centre, described the outrage.

So even while Canadian artists from Feist to Arcade Fire have given Canadian music an unprecedented buzz internationally, the country's once proud classical music community is feeling rather uneasy about its future in a crowded musical marketplace. And many of classical music's supporters believe that's all the more reason why it should receive more public support, whether in the form of direct grants to orchestras and music festivals, or indirect support through extensive airplay on a national broadcaster.

And that's raised an interesting question: Is classical music more deserving of public support than other genres? Is it still as culturally relevant as it once was? For their thoughts on that, we were joined by Andrew Burashko, a concert pianist and the artistic director of the Art of Time Ensemble, and Russell Smith, an arts columnist with the Globe and Mail, and finally by Odario Williams, a rapper with the Winnipeg hip hop group Grand Analog. All three were in Toronto.


Music


Composer: Antonio Vivaldi
Performer: English Chamber Orchestra
Album: The Four Seasons, Volume 1: Spring
Label: ASV
Track: #2: Spring (Largo)


Last Word - Sufi Musician

In this episode, we heard about the latest salvos in Turkey's on-going political fight over how to make the country's two founding principles -- secularism and democracy -- work together. It's proving to be a difficult problem for Turkey's leaders. So we closed the show with someone who's made a career out of mixing disparate traditions. Mercan Dede is a Turkish musician who moved to Montreal in the 1980s. He mixes traditional Sufi religious music with modern electronic music, something he thinks is perfectly in keeping with the Sufi tradition. He says, "The essence of Sufism is counterpoint. Everything exists with its opposite."

We therefore presented Mercan Dede with Ney from his album, Sufi Traveler.


Listen to Part Three:

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