Audience responds to Aboriginal absent Aboriginal fathers discussion

During our program, we have heard statistics and stories from - and about - men who have grown up without fathers in their lives and men who want to make sure their boys and girls know their fathers. We dedicated this last half hour of our program to open up our discussion to our audience.



Three of The Current

Audience responds to absent Aboriginal fathers discussion

One-quarter of the population in Yukon is of Aboriginal ancestry. In fact, only in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut is the proportion higher. In Yukon, 1 in 5 families is headed by a lone parent, usually the mother - that is only of the highest proportions in the country.

Today we are focusing our program on Fathers Without Fathers - Aboriginal Men in Canada. In Whitehorse, Aboriginal fathers gather at the Skookum Jim Friendship centre to get advice, and support in raising their kids. One of men who regularily attend traditional parenting meetings is Dennis Allen. We heard from him.

So far we have heard statistics and stories from - and about - men who have grown up without fathers in their lives and men who want to make sure their boys and girls know their fathers. We dedicated the rest of our program our live audience.

We want to give special thanks to Jessica Ball from the University of Victoria, Geoff Leo, CBC reporter based in Regina, Joe Migwansm and Stan Tu'Inukuafe.Our wonderful colleagues at CBC in Whitehorse and to our enthusiastic and attentive audience at the Yukon Arts Centre.

If those of you listening want to share your opinions, please contact us.

Coming up this evening on CBC television, the first of a four part documentary project we're calling 8th Fire. It's an exploration of what Canadians can do to mend the relationship with Indigenous People. Host Wab Kinew explores misperceptions about Aboriginal rights and benefits and introduces viewers to future leaders. That's tomorrow at 9 o'clock, 9:30 in Newfoundland.

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