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April 02, 2010

Pt 1: Third Man Factor (Repeat) - We re-broadcasting Linden MacIntyre's conversation with John Geiger, the author of The Third Man Factor: The Secret to Survival in Extreme Circumstances. In the book, John Geiger chronicles his attempt to understand why so many people report similar experiences of seeing an elusive "third" ... a mysterious, and supportive presence that appears to them in times of distress or danger. (Read More)
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Pt 2: Working for a Song (Repeat) - It turns out the folks at Disney had it right. A little music can make work more efficient, less stressful and even happier. We have been making music for as long as we have been working. And the connection between the two runs deeper than you might think. We take a second listen to a Roberta Walker's documentary called Working For a Song. (Read More)
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Whole Show Blow-by-Blow

Today's guest host was Linden MacIntyre and this is a Special Good Friday Edition of The Current.

It's Friday, April 2nd.

It's Good Friday, but a court in Ireland is allowing pubs in Limerick to open for a Rugby game.

Currently ... Okay, here we go.

In Limerick you just couldn't drink
On Good Friday or you'd go to the clink
So they took it to court
And the judge was a sport
Now you can pray to a porcelain sink

This is The Current.

Third Man Factor (Repeat)

We started this segment with a reading from T.S. Elliott's The Wasteland, one of the most influential poems of the 20th century. It was written in 1922. And it describes an arduous journey through a desolate land. Along the way, the narrator has a haunting experience. He encounters a mysterious, phantasmal being ... a "third" as he described it. He doesn't know who or what it is. But he can feel its presence.

John Geiger set out on his own expedition to document the real-life encounters people have had with this mysterious "third." In particular, he wanted to know -- scientifically speaking -- what causes it. And along the way, he found a surprising connection between "The Wasteland" and the legendary Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton.

John Geiger is an editorial board member with The Globe and Mail. He's also the author of The Third Man Factor: The Secret to Survival in Extreme Circumstances. We spoke to him in January, 2009.


PART TWO

Working for a Song (Repeat)

It turns out the folks at Disney had it right. A little music can make work more efficient, less stressful and even happier. We have been making music for as long as we have been working. And the connection between the two runs deeper than you might think.

This morning, we thought we take a second listen to a documentary that we first broadcast in January as part of our on-going series, Work In Progress. Roberta Walker's documentary is called Working For a Song.

Noteworthy Documentary Promo

And you can hear more from Roberta next week on The Current when she brings us a new documentary called Noteworthy. As you heard, music used to be a fundamental part of our workworld. The voyageurs sang songs to keep them paddling in rhythm. People working in the fields sang to help them coordinate their activities.

But music lost its place when the industrial revolution came along. Now, however, new research shows that music has a profound impact on our brains and that it can be a benefit in today's workplaces. Next week, Roberta Walker will take us to workplaces where music is making a comeback. We aired a preview.

Last Word - Bunnies

Before we end the program ... If you're thinking of fluffy bunnies as a part of your Easter experience .... here's some advice from the University of Victoria. Don't even think about it. The University has been over-run by feral rabbits. They're causing health and safety problems. And then there's the matter of the daily road-kill clean-up. About a year ago, we heard from Nick Shaw. He's a veterinarian in Victoria. And he had an idea for a non-lethal population control measure ... mass bunny vasectomies.

Now, the University gave the idea a shot. But it didn't work out so well. We heard from Tom Smith, the University's Executive Director of Facilities Management. And with no dent in the bunny population, the University is working on another strategy.

So watch wabbits. And to be clear. No bunnies were harmed in the making of this Special Good Friday Edition of The Current.
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