CBCradio

February 22, 2010

 

Pt 1: Sinking Tall Ship Classroom - As you've been hearing on the news, there were some ecstatic and grateful parents gathering at Toronto's Pearson Airport before dawn this morning, awaiting the arrival of their teenagers.

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Pt 2: Record Breaking Research - We started this segment with a record breaking montage. Thanks to NBC Sports for the audio of Usain Bolt's record-breaking 100 metre sprint and to CTV for the audio of Christine Nesbitt's gold-medal ceremony.

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Pt 3:  Anne Mroczkowski - For more than 20 years, Anne Mroczkowski has been delivering local news in Toronto. She was one of the first female news anchors and has been on the inside as the industry transformed itself. Now, she is out of a job. We hear her thoughts on the future of local news and the state of an industry in trouble.
 
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Whole Show Blow-by-Blow

It's Monday February 22nd.

NBC news is reporting that Vancouver Olympic organizers provided one hundred thousand condoms for athletes at the games.

Currently, Hey, wasn't it the Montreal Olympics that was famous for the big O?

This is the Current.

Sinking Tall Ship Classroom

As you've been hearing on the news, there were some ecstatic and grateful parents gathering at Toronto's Pearson Airport before dawn this morning, awaiting the arrival of their teenagers.

Forty-two Canadian students who survived, along with all others aboard, when their floating classroom, the tall ship SV Concordia capsized and sank off the coast of Brasil last Wednesday.

David Aftergood of Calgary is one of those parents. He's with his 16 year old daughter Olivia and they were at the airport in line waiting for a flight home to Calgary.

Record Breaking Research

We started this segment with a record breaking montage. Thanks to NBC Sports for the audio of Usain Bolt's record-breaking 100 metre sprint and to CTV for the audio of Christine Nesbitt's gold-medal ceremony.

It's moments such as those that drive the world's best athletes and capture the attention of their fans. But according to research published last month, we're seeing those moments less often than we used to.

Geoffroy Berthelot is a French researcher. He looked at all of the world records set over the last century. And he concluded that collectively, the world's athletes have peaked, that the number of world records being set has been on the decline for more than 20 years.

Conrad Earnest is an Editor of the journal, PLoS One which published the research. He's the Director of Exercise Biology at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.


PART TWO


Record Breaking - Coach

Not everyone believes we've seen a peak when it comes to sports records. Athletes and their coaches continue to strive for faster, higher, and stronger performances and with good reason, according to our next guest.

Byron MacDonald is with the Faculty of Physical Education and Health at the University of Toronto, where he's also the head coach of the Varsity Blues swim program. He's also a former Olympic finalist, having competed in the 100-metre butterfly at the 1972 Summer Games. He joined us in our Toronto studio.

Lone Athletes

Samir Azzimani and Robel Zeimichael Teklemariam have a few things in common. They're both elite athletes. They're each skiers -- though Samir is an Alpine skier and Robel skis cross-country. And they are each their countries' only representatives at the Winter Olympics.

Seventeen countries have sent just one athlete to Vancouver. To talk about what it's like to fly solo at the Olympics, we were joined by Samir Azzimani. He represents Morocco. And Robel Zeimichael Teklemariam represents Ethiopia.


PART THREE

Anne Mroczkowski

We started this segment with a clip of a newscast announcing cuts to Rogers Communications.

Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton and Toronto are all one newscast shorter after that announcement last month. And local news has taken another tough hit. Rogers cut about 60 jobs in all. And one of the most well-known people to go was veteran news anchor Anne Mroczkowski.

If you've ever lived in Toronto, you'd likely recognize her as the long-time co-host of City TV's City Pulse and later City News at Six. She and Gord Martineau hosted the newscast together from 1988 until the day she was laid off, making them the longest-serving news team in Canadian television history.

Anne Mroczkowski became a broadcast journalist at a time when women weren't a common sight in newsrooms. For more than two decades, she has been front-and-centre in an ever-changing industry ... an industry that is once again at a crossroads. Anne Mroczkowski was in Toronto as part of our on-going series Work In Progress.


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