CBCradio

January 14, 2010

Pt 1: Haiti Earthquake- We started this segment Bob Poff describing the experience of driving through the worst earthquake in Haiti's history. Bob Poff works for the Salvation Army's Divisional Director of Disaster Services in Haiti. This morning, he faces the daunting task of trying to figure out how to help pick up the pieces in a country where the dead are still being counted. He was in Port au Prince.

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Pt 2: Canadian Fatwa - After the attempted bombing of a U.S.-bound airplane on Christmas Day, Syed Soharwardy decided it was time to take a stand. He is an Imam at the Al-Madinah Calgary Islamic Centre. And now, he has banded together with more than 20 other Imams from across North America, to issue a Fatwa or religious ruling.

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Pt 3: Letters - Thursday is our weekly mail day and our Friday host this week is Rick MacInnes-Rae, the host of CBC Radio's Dispatches.

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It's Thursday, January 14th.

Wall Street executives apologized to U.S. lawmakers for mistakes that led to the financial crisis.

Currently, as a show of good faith, they have also offered to reduce their annual bonuses from outrageous to wildly extravagant.

This is The Current.

Haiti Earthquake - Bob Poff

We started this segment Bob Poff describing the experience of driving through the worst earthquake in Haiti's history. Bob Poff works for the Salvation Army's Divisional Director of Disaster Services in Haiti. This morning, he faces the daunting task of trying to figure out how to help pick up the pieces in a country where the dead are still being counted. He was in Port au Prince.

Haiti Earthquake - Montreal

There are a few hundred thousand Haitian-Canadians. An estimated 80 per cent of them live in the Montreal area and many of them spent yesterday on the phone with CPAM, Montreal's only Haitian radio station.

CPAM broadcasts news, current affairs and music from Haiti seven days a week. Since the earthquake, it has become a lifeline for Haitian-Canadians living in Montreal. And that can be a heavy burden for the people who work there. We heard from Robert Ismael who is a journalist with CPAM, a radio station that serves the Haitian community in Montreal. And The host is Yvon Cheri.

Robintz Paul is still trying to find out more about his family in Haiti. He was born in Haiti and now lives in Montreal, where he is the Director of a youth centre called the Maison des Jeunes Cote-des-Neiges. He's also part of the hip-hop group Nomadic Massive and he was in Montreal.

Haiti Earthquake - Frank Chauvin

We wanted to check in with someone we heard from yesterday. Frank Chauvin lives in Windsor, Ontario. Twenty-two years ago, he founded an orphanage in Port au Prince that has 70 girls ages 5 to 15. The orphanage is called Le foyer des Filles de Dieu. When we spoke to him yesterday, he hadn't been able to get through to the orphanage. Frank Chauvin joined us again for an update.

Music Bridge

Artist: Ray Montford
Cut: CD5 Never Came Home
CD: Live Imagery
Label: Softail Records
Spine: L 105CD


Listen to Part One:

 

Canadian Fatwa

After the attempted bombing of a U.S.-bound airplane on Christmas Day, Syed Soharwardy decided it was time to take a stand. He is an Imam at the Al-Madinah Calgary Islamic Centre. And now, he has banded together with more than 20 other Imams from across North America, to issue a Fatwa or religious ruling.

The Fatwa condemns any attack on North America and says that all Muslims have a duty to try to prevent such an attack. Imam Syed Soharwardy was in Calgary. Ali Hindy is the Imam at the Salahuddin Islamic Centre in Toronto.


Listen to Part Two:

 

Letters

Thursday is our weekly mail day and our Friday host this week is Rick MacInnes-Rae, the host of CBC Radio's Dispatches.

Shania Twain: Last week's Friday host was Shania Twain who has long been the pride of Timmins, Ontario. Before taking on the hosting duties last Friday, Shania came into our studio to tell us more about her childhood -- a childhood marked by hunger and poverty. And that prompted her to start a charity called Shania Kids Can -- to support children who are having difficulties at home.

Many listeners were charmed by the opportunity to hear Shania Twain speak so candidly -- not only as a guest, but as our Friday host. We heard suggestions that she be named "Queen of Canada" or she should turn to politics. We also heard from you.

Women's Studies: Women's studies programs have been commonplace in universities ever since San Diego State University established the first program in 1970. But today, many women's studies departments are renaming themselves as gender or equality studies -- in an effort to gain a broader appeal and relevance.
Tuesday on the program, we discussed the state of feminism. And one voice we heard was Barbara Kay, a columnist for the National Post who told us what she thinks renaming the program will do.

And after hearing this item, our inbox was full of feedback. Some listeners felt there was a need to do more on this item. Renee Bondy from University of Windsor wrote:

If The Current is truly interested in the challenges and victories of today's Women's Studies programs, you need to speak to the students and faculty who dedicate hemselves to the field.

So taking her advice, we were joined by Ann Braithwaite. She is an Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Women's Studies department at the University of Prince Edward Island. She is also an executive member of the Canadian Women's Studies Association, a professional organization that represents approximately 400 members, most of whom are faculty and students in Women's Studies departments across Canada. She was in Charlottetown this morning.

Proroguing Parliament: Proroguing parliament has become an annual event in Ottawa. And last week, as protesters planning demonstrations in several cities across the country, we speculated on what difference it makes whether parliament is sitting. Our panel included Lydia Miljan. She teaches Canadian Public Policy at the University of Windsor. Her views lit a fire under a few listeners and we read some today.

Wiebo Ludwig: The arrest and subsequent release of Wiebo Ludwig last weekend was followed by a sweeping search of his property by the RCMP. They are looking for evidence connected with the bombings of six gas pipelines in northeastern British Columbia. Monday on The Current, we spoke with Mr Ludwig from his home. Hearing him speak, prompted our listeners to respond including Dave Carnell of Millarville, Alberta who suggests: I appreciate that the residents of northeastern BC and north-western Alberta are having problems with the oil and gas industry, but surely you can find a better advocate for their concerns.

Tim Ewert has thoughts of his own about this subject. He is an organic farmer from Pouce Coupe, a small village near Dawson Creek in northern British Columbia. We reached him at his home.

Music Bridge

Artist: Thievery Corporation
Cd: Radio Retaliation
Cut: CD 8, The Forgotten People
Label: ESL
Spine: ESL 140


Listen to Part Three:

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