CBCradio

December 29, 2009

Pt 1: More Racial Profiling?- On Christmas Day, Umar Farouk Abdulmatallab tried and failed to blow up a Northwest Airlines plane approaching Detroit. By Boxing Day, airports across North America were in gridlock, as passengers endured painfully long waits to board their flights ... many of which were delayed or cancelled as a result of security bottlenecks.

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Pt 2: Vitamen Eh - Documentary - The World Food Summit wrapped up last month without securing the 44-billion-dollars in new agricultural development money that the United Nations had hoped for. But even if a massive global push to end hunger has yet to coalesce, some solutions to specific aspects of malnutrition are gaining ground. Take Vitamin A deficiency, for example. Close to half-a-million children go blind from a lack of Vitamin A every year, and half of them die within a year of losing their sight. Canadian aid and research has helped to bring a Vitamin-A enriched variety of sweet potato to Uganda ... a country where drought has led to famine.

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Pt 3: Mad Child Interview - By just about any measure one of Canada's best-known rap groups, British Columbia-based Swollen Members, a big homegrown success - gold records, extensive touring and four Juno Awards. But all that success has meant also meant a lot of excess-- money, cars, girls, and of course, drugs.

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The guest host was Kevin Sylvester.

It's Tuesday December 29th.

The first YMCA in the United States opened 158 years ago today.

Currently, The manager promises to have the showers fixed by Thursday.


This is The Current.


More Racial Profiling?

Tarek Fatah

On Christmas Day, Umar Farouk Abdulmatallab tried and failed to blow up a Northwest Airlines plane approaching Detroit. By Boxing Day, airports across North America were in gridlock, as passengers endured painfully long waits to board their flights ... many of which were delayed or cancelled as a result of security bottlenecks.

Some people take the stepped-up security precautions as inevitable ... others call for a more a measured response. The Council on American-Islamic Relations - also known as CAIR - has urged airline passengers, crews and security personnel to avoid ethnic and religious profiling.

But after last week's incident, there are those who have come to a different conclusion -- such as Tarek Fatah, the founder of the Muslim Canadian Congress and the author of, Chasing A Mirage: The Tragic Illusion Of An Islamic State. Tarek Fatah joined Kevin in Toronto.

Council on American-Islamic Relations

The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), is calling on airline passengers, crews and security personnel to resist ethnic and religious profiling.

According to CAIR's National Communications Director, Ibrahim Hooper profiling is, "counterproductive and can lead to a climate of insecurity and fear." We reached Mr. Hooper at his home in Washington, D.C.



 

Vitamen Eh - Documentary

The World Food Summit wrapped up last month without securing the 44-billion-dollars in new agricultural development money that the United Nations had hoped for. But even if a massive global push to end hunger has yet to coalesce, some solutions to specific aspects of malnutrition are gaining ground. Take Vitamin A deficiency, for example. Close to half-a-million children go blind from a lack of Vitamin A every year, and half of them die within a year of losing their sight. 


Canadian aid and research has helped to bring a Vitamin-A enriched variety of sweet potato to Uganda, a country where drought has led to famine.

But as Canadian freelance journalist Paul Webster found out on a recent trip to Uganda, it's not as simple as just giving people lots of supercharged sweet potatoes to plant and eat - there are also cultural food biases and climate change to complicate the fight against hunger. This is Paul Webster's documentary, Vitamin Eh, which first aired back in November.

Click here for more information on the Sweet Potato Project in Uganda.



 

Mad Child Interview

By just about any measure one of Canada's best-known rap groups, British Columbia-based Swollen Members, a big homegrown success - gold records, extensive touring and four Juno Awards. But all that success has meant also meant a lot of excess-- money, cars, girls, and of course, drugs.

For band member Shane Bunting - or Mad Child as he's better known - those trappings proved too much to resist, especially the drugs. His habit became so all-consuming it threatened his career and his life.

Mad Child joined us from Montreal for the show to tell us about his descent into addiction and what it's taken to climb back out.


Last Word

Earlier in the program we profiled "profiling", in light of the Christmas Day incident on a flight from Amsterdam to Detroit. And we also heard a first-hand account of profiling from Nazim Baksh, a Muslim-Canadian journalist with the CBC who has travelled frequently to and from the U.S. in the past decade. We leave you today with another one of his "profiling' anecdotes.



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