CBCradio

December 14, 2009

Pt 1: Mayors in Copenhagen Panel - Tens of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Copenhagen on the weekend as part of a Global Day of Action on The Climate. There were as many as a thousand arrests on Saturday and displays of anger as they protest a lack of action at the United Nations Climate Change Summit. The summit continues this week ... as do the demonstrations.

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Pt 2: Elderly Care - We started this segment with a clip of Doctor Jay Slater pulling up to the curb in his black Smart Car. He jokes that he should put a handle on the top, to make it look like a doctor's bag. The car is his proxy office. He drives to his patients' homes around Vancouver. His patients are all elderly and often frail. He's one of just a handful of Canadian doctors whose entire practice is built on going out to see the housebound elderly ... people such as Anne - a 94-year-old in Vancouver. We heard her story.

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Pt 3: Afghan Midwives - When complications arise during a childbirth, Canadian doctors have all sorts of options when it comes to saving the life of the baby and the mother. But where Matthew Roddick works -- at the Bamiyan Provincial Hospital in Afghanistan -- things aren't nearly so easy. Pashtoon Azfar is the President of the Afghan Midwives Association. She was in Kabul.

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It's Monday December 14th.

Tiger Woods says he will take an "indefinite break" from professional golf.

Currently, because that's what Tiger Woods needs...more time on his hands.

This is The Current.


Mayors in Copenhagen Panel

Tens of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Copenhagen on the weekend as part of a Global Day of Action on The Climate. There were as many as a thousand arrests on Saturday and displays of anger as they protest a lack of action at the United Nations Climate Change Summit. The summit continues this weel ... as do the demonstrations.

But to some, the real momentum is in another part of the city. That's where city leaders from all over the world will convene for the Copenhagen Climate Summit for Mayors. While the national delegations at the U.N. summit shoot for a climate change target that everyone can agree to, cities all over the world are cutting greenhouse gas emissions deeper and faster. For example, Canada's official target is to cut its emissions to 20 per cent below 2006 levels by 2020. That's about 3 per cent below 1990 levels. The City of Toronto, meanwhile, is shooting to cut twice as much and to get there 8 years earlier.

For their thoughts on the role that cities are and should be playing in combatting climate change, we were joined by three people, all are attending the mayors' summit. David Miller is the Mayor of Toronto and the Chair of the C40 Group of World Cities. Lord Mayor Ritt Bjerregaard is the Mayor of Copenhagen and the host of the Summit. And Marcelo Ebrard is the Mayor of Mexico City. They were all in Copenhagen attending the Copenhagen Climate Summit for Mayors.


 

Elderly Care - House Call

We started this segment with a clip of Doctor Jay Slater pulling up to the curb in his black Smart Car. He jokes that he should put a handle on the top, to make it look like a doctor's bag. The car is his proxy office. He drives to his patients' homes around Vancouver. His patients are all elderly and often frail. He's one of just a handful of Canadian doctors whose entire practice is built on going out to see the housebound elderly ... people such as Anne - a 94-year-old in Vancouver. We heard her story.

Eldercare - A Bitter Pill

Doctor Jay Slater is one of only a few Canadian doctors whose entire practice is built on visiting elderly patients in their homes. It's what Doctor John Sloan did for much of his career.

Doctor Sloan is semi-retired now. And he's written a book in which he argues that the best place for his patients is in their homes while the worst is often - in a hospital. The book is called A Bitter Pill: How the Medical System is Failing the Elderly. Doctor John Sloan was in Vancouver.



 

Afghan Midwives

When complications arise during a childbirth, Canadian doctors have all sorts of options when it comes to saving the life of the baby and the mother. But where Matthew Roddick works -- at the Bamiyan Provincial Hospital in Afghanistan -- things aren't nearly so easy. Pashtoon Azfar is the President of the Afghan Midwives Association. She was in Kabul.

Afghan Midwives

The challenges are everywhere in making childbirth safer for Afghan women. Even in a city the size of Kabul, hospitals and clinics don't always have the supplies or the people they need. Rosemary Bolza knows that first hand. She's an American mid-wife who just finished a stint at the women's hospital in Kabul.

Afghan Midwives

Much of the information we have about how many women in Afghanistan die from childbirth comes from a study done in 2002. In fact that study, helped inspire the midwife training programs. Candian Doctor Linda Bartlett was one of the study's authors. She is a medical doctor at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. She was in Baltimore, Maryland this morning. 


Last Word - Eat Your Dog

We ended the program with some bad news for dog-lovers with green aspirations. It concerns a book out of New Zealand called Time to Eat the Dog: The Real Guide to Sustainable Living. We let Danny Harvey -- a climate change professor at the University of Toronto -- explain.

To calculate that carbon footprint, it helps to know a few things. Medium-sized dogs eat about 164 kilograms of meat and 95 kilograms of cereals every year. Growing and manufacturing all that food requires nearly 1 hectare of land. As a carbon pawprint that's like driving ten thousand kilometres in a Land Cruiser.

So, armed with this information, The Current's Shannon Higgins headed out to a dog park in Toronto to see if anyone would give up their dog to reduce their ecological footprint.



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