CBCradio

October 28, 2009

Pt 1: Paul Pritchard - We started this segment with sound from the video shot by Paul Pritchard ... the one that shows Robert Dziekanski, angry and confused, at the Vancouver airport two years ago. Moments later, Robert Dziekanski is stunned by Police using a Taser. He struggles with them. And then he dies. All of that is on the video.

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Pt 2: Shopkeeper- We started this segment with a clip of David Chen. He owns a small grocery store in Toronto's Chinatown. And he says he has complained to police for years about shoplifting in the neighbourhood.

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Pt 3: Hacking Work - We continue our on-going series Work In Progress this morning with a look at a particular breed of worker ... people who hack the companies for which they work, in a bid -- they say -- to save them.

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It's Wednesday, October 28th.

A United Nations official says the United States needs to demonstrate that the unmanned drones it is using in Afghanistan aren't just killing people randomly.

Currently, He was then shot dead. Point proven.

This is The Current.


Paul Pritchard

We started this segment with sound from the video shot by Paul Pritchard ... the one that shows Robert Dziekanski, angry and confused, at the Vancouver airport two years ago. Moments later, Robert Dziekanski is stunned by Police using a Taser. He struggles with them. And then he dies. All of that is on the video.

Curt Petrovich is a national reporter based in Vancouver. He has been covering the inquiry into Robert Dziekanski's death from the beginning. And yesterday he had the chance to sit down with Paul Pritchard to talk about his life since shooting that video. Curt Petrovich was in our Toronto studio to share Paul Pritchard's story.

Music Bridge

Artist: Caribou
CD: Milk of Human Kindness
Cut: 10, Pelican Narrows
Label: Domino



 

Shopkeeper

We started this segment with a clip of David Chen. He owns a small grocery store in Toronto's Chinatown. And he says he has complained to police for years about shoplifting in the neighbourhood.

So last May, when he and two of his employees spotted a man they thought had stolen some plants from the shop, they chased him down, tied him up, locked him in a delivery truck and called the police. The police charged the shoplifter. But they also charged David Chen and his employees with assault, kidnapping, unlawful confinement and carrying concealed weapons -- in this case, box-cutters.

The Current's producer, Kristin Nelson, spent some time at David Chen's shop yesterday and asked him why he decided to take matters into his own hands that day. We aired that tape. The last voice on the tape was John Chan, another shop owner in Toronto's Chinatown and one of David Chen's supporters.

The Crown did offer David Chen a deal ... plead guilty to two of the four charges he's facing, and serve no time in jail. But Peter Lindsay, Mr. Chen's lawyer, rejected the deal and said he would welcome a jury trial. Peter Lindsay was in Toronto this morning.

Shopkeeper - Criminologist

Michael Kempa has been watching this story unfold. And to him, it's just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to issues of policing and justice. Michael Kempa is a professor of Criminology at the University of Ottawa.




 

Hacking Work

We continue our on-going series Work In Progress this morning with a look at a particular breed of worker ... people who hack the companies for which they work, in a bid - they say - to save them.

We aired a few quotations from a soon-to-be published book called Hacking Work: Saving Business From Itself, One Bad Act at a Time. The authors are Joshua Klein, a hacker of everything from consumer hardware to social systems and Bill Jensen, the author of several books about working smarter, not harder.

In the book, they chronicle what they call "benevolent hackers" ... people who jump firewalls, ignore corporate rules or use unsanctioned software. They argue that they're breaking the rules so that everyone can work more effectively. Bill Jensen and Joshua Klein were in our New York studio.

The book, Hacking Work: Saving Business From Itself, One Bad Act at a Time is due to be released next spring.

Last Word - Taser

We ended the program today with one more piece of tape about Tasers ... something we touched on earlier in the show. Over the summer, Taser International launched a new product called "Taser X3." Taser calls it "a revolutionary product that can engage multiple targets and deliver a calibrated Neuro Muscular Incapacitation pulse." The company tested the gun on three employees, each of whom was lined up with two men on each arm in order to brace their fall. We aired the audio from that test.



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