CBCradio

October 16, 2009

Pt 1: Mining Bill Debate - Canadian mining companies, environmentalists and human rights activists are all keeping a close eye on a private member's bill that's working its way through parliament. Bill C-300 would give the Canadian Government the power to investigate Canadian resource companies operating abroad.

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Pt 2: Copyright Wars - When Ralph Lauren put out an ad featuring model Filippa Hamilton, more than a few people noticed something a little funny about it. Filippa Hamilton is five-foot-ten and 120 pounds. She's a size four. But somehow, she looked all out of proportion. The ad was reprinted on the American web site Photoshop Disaster.

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Pt 3: Retirement Study - For lots of people, the idea of never having to work again would be a dream come true. But according to a new study, all that "R and R" can cause problems. For more than 15 years, researchers in the United States tracked more than 12,000 people as they headed into retirement. And they found that retirees who take on temporary or part-time work have fewer major diseases and function better day-to-day.

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Today's guest host was Hana Gartner.


It's Friday October 16th.

A report prepared for the Australian government says toddlers should be banned from watching television

Currently ... Whereas radio listening leads to slim, good-looking, well adjusted adults who live well into their early hundreds.

This is The Current.


Mining Bill Debate

Canadian mining companies, environmentalists and human rights activists are all keeping a close eye on a private member's bill that's working its way through parliament. Bill C-300 would give the Canadian Government the power to investigate Canadian resource companies operating abroad.

Some Canadian companies have been accused of being complicit in environmental and human rights abuses in the countries in which they operate. And under Bill C-300, Canadian companies could be cut off from significant sources of government money if they don't live up to standards of corporate responsibility.

Earlier this week, the bill was named as an important part of a new campaign aimed at ending the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Thousands of people have been killed or displaced there. And women are routinely raped as militias fight for control of lucrative mineral deposits.

Tanja Bergen launched the No More Rape Campaign in Vancouver this week. She's the Executive Director of the Africa Canada Accountability Coalition. And we asked her to connect the dots between rape in the DRC and Bill C-300.

For their thoughts on the merits of Bill C-300, we were joined by two people. John McKay is a Liberal MP and the author of Bill C-300. And Jon Baird is the President of the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada, a group that represents the mineral exploration and development industry. They were both in Toronto.



 

Copyright Wars: Boing Boing

When Ralph Lauren put out an ad featuring model Filippa Hamilton, more than a few people noticed something a little funny about it. Filippa Hamilton is five-foot-ten and 120 pounds. She's a size four. But somehow, she looked all out of proportion. The ad was reprinted on the American web sitePhotoshop Disaster.

That's where Xeni Jardin saw it. And to her, the problem was obvious. As she told her readers on the pop culture web site Boing Boing, Dude, her head's bigger than her pelvis. Ralph Lauren didn't take too kindly to that observation. Soon the lawyer's letters were flying to both Photoshop Disasters and Boing Boing demanding that the photo be removed because of copyright infringement.

Xeni Jardin is an editor with the web site Boing Boing.net and the author of the now-classic post, Dude, her head's bigger than her pelvis. She joined us from her a cell-phone in Los Angeles.

We did try to get a comment from Ralph Lauren about the controversy involving Boing Boing and Photoshop Disasters, but they did not respond.

Copyright Wars

So in Canada lawyer letters related to copyright infringement can be treated as a joke. But in the U.S. it is no laughing matter. What the dust-up between Ralph Lauren, Boing Boing and Photoshop Disasters highlights are the differences between how American and Canadian-based internet servers deal with issues of alleged copyright infringement.

To help us understand how things work here, we were joined by Grace Westcott. She is a lawyer and the Vice Chair of the Canadian Copyright Institute. And she was in our Toronto studio.

Copyright Wars

So for an American perspective, we reached William Patry. He is one of the leading experts on copyright law. He was the copyright counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives' Committee on the Judiciary. He's now the Senior Copyright Counsel at Google. And his new book is called Moral Panics and the Copyright Wars. William Patry was in our New York studio.



 

Retirement Study

For lots of people, the idea of never having to work again would be a dream come true. But according to a new study, all that "R and R" can cause problems.
For more than 15 years, researchers in the United States tracked more than 12,000 people as they headed into retirement. And they found that retirees who take on temporary or part-time work have fewer major diseases and function better day-to-day.

The study was published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology. As part of our ongoing series, Work In Progress we reached Mo Wang. He is one of its authors. He's also a Psychology Professor at the University of Maryland. He's also one of the authors of the report Bridge Employment and Retirees Health. We reached him in College Park, Maryland.

Retirement Panel

Now Canada's seniors population has nearly doubled since the early eighties, and is expected to double again within the next 25 years. So more people will be finding themselves figuring out how, or even whether, they should retire.

For their thoughts on the value of work and retirement, we were joined by three people. Susan Eng is the Vice President for CARP, a national advocacy group for older people. She is also a retired tax lawyer and she was in Toronto. Dan Braniff retired from Bell Canada in 1985. At the time he was the manager of sales for Ontario. He was in Owen Sound. And Allen Garr is a journalist and beekeeper. He will be 68 next month and he is retired but has no plans to stop working any time soon. He was in Vancouver.

Last Word - Re-mixing Yoko Ono

We ended the show this week with someone who is working well past the traditional retirement age. Yoko Ono is 76. She has a new album out. It's called Between My Head and The Sky. And she has announced a "crowd-sourced remix project" for her new single. What that means is that she is inviting people to take the song piece by piece and reassemble it as they see fit.

And to help things along, Yoko Ono has released all of the individial tracks for the song under a Creative Commons license. That means anyone is free to take the pieces and do whatever they like with them including posting them on-line and sharing them with others -- as long as they don't use them for commercial purposes. You can find all the bits and pieces at yopob.com. That's Yoko Ono Plastic Ono Band. We ended with the original version of the song. Happy mixing.



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