CBCradio

September 22, 2009

Pt 1: H1N1 - Accountability & Liability - Sometime in the next month or so, Canadians will start lining up for the H1N1 flu vaccine. The vaccine is undergoing clinical trials now. The first doses could be ready as early as November... a faster roll-out than is usually the case. Drug-maker GlaxoSmithKline is producing the vaccine.

Download Flash Player to view this content.



Pt 2: Welland - Part Two - As the manufacturing jobs disappear in Welland people are realizing that in order to work, and to work in Welland they have to change their expectation that a job is for life. As part of our series, Work In Progress, the Current goes to the United Steel workers adjustment centre to find out how laid off workers are adjusting their view of work.

Download Flash Player to view this content.



Pt 3: "Will to Intervene" - We started this segment with a clip of General Romeo Dallaire speaking on As It Happens on April 7th, 1994. No one knew it then, but he was describing the beginning of the Rwandan Genocide ... a hundred days of bloody massacres that would leave 800,000 people dead. It's been fifteen years since those events and more than 60 years since the United Nations General Assembly first condemned genocide as a crime punishable under international law.

Download Flash Player to view this content.




It's Tuesday, September 22nd.

U.S. President Barack Obama says the press is perpetuating rude behaviour

Currently.... YOU LIE!!!

This is the Current.

H1N1 - Accountability & Liability

Sometime in the next month or so, Canadians will start lining up for the H1N1 flu vaccine. The vaccine is undergoing clinical trials now. The first doses could be ready as early as November... a faster roll-out than is usually the case. Drug-maker GlaxoSmithKline is producing the vaccine.

The Federal Government has been clear there will be enough doses for everyone in Canada who wants or needs one. But what isn't clear - - is who will be held responsible if anyone is injured or made sick by the vaccine. In the United States, drug-makers and federal officials have been given immunity from swine flu vaccine lawsuits. There's no word yet whether Canada will follow suit.

Kumanan Wilson thinks he has a plan that would work for Canada. He is a Doctor of Internal Medicine at Ottawa Hospital. He's also a Canada Research Chair in Public Health Policy at the University of Ottawa. Kumanan Wilson was in Ottawa.

H1N1 Accountability - Pharma

The Current requested an interview with GlaxoSmithKline, the company that is developing Canada's H1N1 flu vaccine. A representative from the company declined our request. However, the company did issue this statement:

GSK is discussing issues relating to potential liability exposure associated with pandemic preparedness products, including vaccines, in the context of its pandemic planning negotiations with all governments, including the Canadian government. The details of the contract negotiations with the Canadian government are confidential and cannot be discussed further.

GlaxoSmithKline reported better-than-expected profits during its first quarter, in part due to orders for vaccines and flu drugs. It now has contracts for $195 million doses worldwide. Sales of its antiviral drug Relenza jumped nearly 2,000 per cent compared to a year ago, as governments stocked up to fight the pandemic. Its second quarter profits are reported to be $2.4 billion. The company also predicts that flu vaccine sales will result in strong profits in the second half of this year.

And that's where Joel Lexchin comes in. He's an emergency physician and a professor at York University's School of Health Policy and Management. And he says that as long as the pharmaceutical industry is making money from products to help fight the H1N1 flu pandemic, it should be prepared to take responsibility for any negative side effects that might crop up down the road. Joel Lexchin was in our Toronto studio.


Welland - Part Two

As the manufacturing jobs disappear in Welland people are realizing that in order to work, and to work in Welland they have to change their expectation that a job is for life. As part of our series, Work In Progress, the Current goes to the United Steel workers adjustment centre to find out how laid off workers are adjusting their view of work.

"Will to Intervene" - Panel

We started this segment with a clip of General Romeo Dallaire speaking on As It Happens on April 7th, 1994. No one knew it then, but he was describing the beginning of the Rwandan Genocide ... a hundred days of bloody massacres that would leave 800,000 people dead. It's been fifteen years since those events and more than 60 years since the United Nations General Assembly first condemned genocide as a crime punishable under international law.

The world is still struggling with how to stop mass atrocities. And according to Romeo Dallaire, we are still failing. Romeo Dallaire is now a Liberal Senator. He's also part of a project called Will To Intervene. Yesterday, the group released a report that it hopes will help stop mass atrocities ... a report that has the backing of several prominent Canadians, including Conservative Senator Hugh Segal and former Federal NDP Leader Ed Broadbent who was also the President of the International Centre of Human Rights and Democratic Development at the time of the Rwandan genocide. Romeo Dallaire, Hugh Segal and Ed Broadbent joined us from Ottawa this morning.

Last Word - Welland Pt 3 Promo


We ended the program this morning with a little preview of tomorrow's program. We'll have the last installment of our look at Welland and what we can all learn from its reaction to big job losses. We'll meet some innovative and inspirational people who are finding fortune in the ruin.

Bookmark and Share
  • Commenting has been disabled for this entry.