CBCradio

September 11, 2009

Pt 1: Translators in War - Working in a war zone is a dangerous business, particularly for local translators and interpreters who - so often - are targeted precisely because they are locals. Our next guest knows that all too well. He is an Afghan national who worked as a translator for coalition forces in Afghanistan. He fled to Canada 18 months ago after he started getting death threats. And he is telling his story for the first time this morning. We agreed to withhold his name because of concerns for his safety. We called him Amid.

Download Flash Player to view this content.



Pt 2: Renegade Nuns - The Vatican has launched a pair of sweeping investigations into Catholic sisters in the United States. Investigations that some in the church believe are aimed at reigning in those who have broken with traditional church teachings. But others say the investigations are good for the church, and long overdue.

Download Flash Player to view this content.



Pt 3: End of Newspapers - The Daily Newspaper passed away slowly -- almost imperceptibly -- right before our eyes. A reliable companion at the breakfast table, on the commuter train, even in the bathroom. A purveyor of muckraking, rabble-rousing and ambulance-chasing that was by turns objective and opinionated. It will be remembered as an essential and unwavering part of modern life. It is survived by countless devoted readers and employees, all wondering ... what next?

Download Flash Player to view this content.




It's Friday, September 11th.

Starting this fall, CBC Television programs such as Being Erica will include product placements by the TD Bank. The move has angered many who see it as the further commercialization of public broadcasting.

Currently, this satire brought to you by the arbitrary whims of the Minister of Finance, Jim Flaherty. Who, by the way, is very handsome.

This is The Current.

Translators in War - Amid

Working in a war zone is a dangerous business, particularly for local translators and interpreters who - so often - are targeted precisely because they are locals. Our next guest knows that all too well. He is an Afghan national who worked as a translator for coalition forces in Afghanistan. He fled to Canada 18 months ago after he started getting death threats. And he is telling his story for the first time this morning. We agreed to withhold his name because of concerns for his safety. We called him Amid.

Translators in War - Safi

Ali Safi is a doctor by training. But he became a journalist and translator several years ago to try to make a better living working for numerous foreign correspondents and media outlets in Afghanistan. Ali Safi was in Kabul.


Renegade Nuns - Hitchcock

The Vatican has launched a pair of sweeping investigations into Catholic sisters in the United States. Investigations that some in the church believe are aimed at reigning in those who have broken with traditional church teachings. But others say the investigations are good for the church, and long overdue.

Helen Hitchcock is the Director of Women for Faith and Family. She's also the author of The Politics of Prayer: Feminist Language and the Worship of God. She was in St. Louis.

Renegade Nuns - Ciketic

The nuns of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in California will not be subject to the Vatican's inquiries. That's because they broke with the church about 40 years ago, after coming to the conclusion that they couldn't toe the Vatican's line.

Today, they consider themselves a not-for-profit, lay Catholic apostolate. Among other things, they do social work and teach in the community. Annette Ciketic belongs to the Immaculate Heart of Mary and she was in San Pedro, California.

Liberal Nuns

For a sense of how American sisters are feeling about the investigations, we were joined by Sister Nancy Schreck. She is the President of the Sisters of Saint Francis and a former President of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious. She was in Dubuque, Iowa.

End of Newspapers - La Presse

The Daily Newspaper passed away slowly -- almost imperceptibly -- right before our eyes. A reliable companion at the breakfast table, on the commuter train, even in the bathroom. A purveyor of muckraking, rabble-rousing and ambulance-chasing that was by turns objective and opinionated. It will be remembered as an essential and unwavering part of modern life. It is survived by countless devoted readers and employees, all wondering ... what next?

Okay, maybe that obit is a little premature. Plenty of papers, including the one Jan Wong used to write for, are still churning out an edition or two every day. But then again, you can't open a paper these days without reading about a once-mighty publication that has filed for bankruptcy or abandoned newsprint for the Web.

The Chicago Tribune and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer are two good examples. And last week, Montreal's La Presse said that it too may have to cease and desist. Caroline Jamet is the newspaper's Vice President of Communications. And she says that if the paper can't negotiate 13-million-dollars worth of concessions from its staff, it will have to close its doors. We heard from Caroline Jamet who is a spokesperson for La Presse.

End of Newspapers - Panel

For their thoughts on whether newspapers have a future, and what might replace them if they don't, we were joined by three people. Valerie Dufour is a reporter in Montreal. Jeff vonKaenel is the President and CEO of the News and Review newspapers in California. And David Black is the President and CEO of Black Press Ltd., which owns 150 papers in British Columbia and Washington state.

Last Word - Sister Dorothy Stang

We ended the program with one more thought on religious activism ... something we touched on earlier in the program. Sister Dorothy Stang was a nun from Ohio who spent 30 years living in Brazil and working with indigenous peoples to protect the rainforest from illegal logging and ranching. She was murdered in 2005 at the age of 74. Many suspect she was killed at the behest of a rancher. A few months after her death, Anna Maria Tremonti spoke with Sister Joan Krimm, one of Sister Dorothy Stang's closest friends. We ended the week with an excerpt from that interview.

Bookmark and Share
  • Commenting has been disabled for this entry.