CBCradio

July 30, 2009

Pt 1: Youth Justice - The news of Melissa Todorovic's fate made headlines this week. She was 15-years-old when 14-year-old Stefanie Rengel was fatally stabbed by Todorovic's 17-year-old boyfriend on Jan. 1, 2008. Becuase of her age she was tried under the Youth Criminal Justice Act and convicted of first-degree murder.

Download Flash Player to view this content.



Pt 2: Our Modern Relationship with Garbage - Well there's nothing like a long garbage strike -- and almost fifty thousand aromatic tonnes of accumulated trash lying around -- to make you reflect on what you throw away. Residents of Toronto and Windsor were doing just that this summer. Monday on The Current, we heard from a couple of people who have given this some thought, including Globe and Mail style columnist, Karen von Hahn.

Download Flash Player to view this content.




It's Thursday, July 30th.

Microsoft has reached a deal with Yahoo Inc. to pool their resources on internet searches.

Currently, it's a huge deal... so big that when you google it, you get 143 million hits.

This is The Current.


Youth Justice

The news of Melissa Todorovic's fate made headlines this week.

She was 15-years-old when 14-year-old Stefanie Rengel was fatally stabbed by Todorovic's 17-year-old boyfriend on Jan. 1, 2008. Becuase of her age she was tried under the Youth Criminal Justice Act and convicted of first-degree murder.

When it came to her sentencing this week, the judge imposed a much harsher prison term than the maximum youth sentence. He sentenced Melissa Todorovic as an adult to life in prison.

Implications of the Outcome

For their thoughts on the implications of applying adult punishments to young offenders, Tom was joined by three guests.

David Toner is the president and co-founder of Families against Crime and Trauma, or FACT, and he was in Vancouver.

Bill Trudell is the Chair of the Canadian Council of Criminal Defence Lawyers. He was in Toronto.

Rosemary Gartner is a professor of Criminology and Sociology at the University of Toronto. She was in Toronto.

Letters Pack

Time for our weekly dip into the mail and The Current's producer, John Chipman, joined Tom in studio to lend a hand.

Our Modern Relationship with Garbage

Well there's nothing like a long garbage strike -- and almost fifty thousand aromatic tonnes of accumulated trash lying around -- to make you reflect on what you throw away. Residents of Toronto and Windsor were doing just that this summer. Monday on The Current, we heard from a couple of people who have given this some thought, including Globe and Mail style columnist, Karen von Hahn.

Our relationship with waste is actually a relatively new phenomenon. John Clark is the Director of the Institute for Environmental History at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland.

He has written extensively on the history of science and the environment, including the history of waste. His latest book is called Bugs and the Victorians. And he joined Tom from St. Andrews for the Letters section of this day's show.

The Lost Art of Getting Lost

It's summer, the season of the road trip. But as many hit the road, they are armed with a new essential tool -- the global positioning device. And while some exhort the joys of GPS others long for days of wanderlust and unexpected discovery. Last Friday on the program, we speculated whether GPS devices are fundamentally changing the way we travel.

Write Us

If you have something to say, we want to hear it. You can email us from our website and click on the Contact Us link. Or call us toll free, day or night, at 1 877 287 7366. You can also find us on Twitter at TheCurrentCBC. Or drop us a note via Canada Post : Box 500, Station A, Toronto, M5W 1E6.


Part Two, Cont'd: Do No Harm - Documentary

In many conflicts there's a moment when the perception of what's happening suddenly shifts, when one aspect of the conflict snaps into an especially sharp focus. During Israel's three week assault on Gaza in January, that moment unfolded on live TV, when a Palestinian doctor was heard on an Israeli news broadcast moments after an Israeli shell smashed into his house. Three of his daughters were killed along with his niece. Another daughter and niece were severely wounded.

Dr. Abu al-Aish was a gynecologist and pioneer in infertility treatment and the proud father of 8 children. For the last 15 years he had crossed the border almost daily to work in Israeli hospitals. Up until that moment, the doctor had been an outspoken advocate for peace between Israelis and Palestinians and his work had also caught the attention of a Canadian doctor living in Toronto named Peter Singer. And in the days before that fateful attack, Dr. Singer worked furiously to get Dr. Al-Aish's family out of Gaza safely.

Reporter Piya Chattopadhyay prepared a documentary about Dr. Abu al-Aish's story. The documentary is called Do No Harm.

Bookmark and Share
  • Commenting has been disabled for this entry.