CBCradio

July 29, 2009

Pt 1: Canada's Role in Honduras - When the ousted President of Honduras, Manuel Zelaya, briefly set foot in his home country, it was Zelaya's latest attempt at returning to Honduras since he was forced out of power and into exile on June 28th.

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Pt 2: George Vallient - Ah, The Good Life ... you might define it as a villa in Tuscany ... or simply being surrounded by family and friends. Either way, the good life is a lot easier to define than to achieve -- hence the massive self-help industry. But what if we could put people's lives under a microscope to understand exactly what makes a good life?

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It's Wednesday, July 29th.

Kory Teneycke, Stephen Harper's director of communications, is resigning.

Currently, the Prime Minister responded .... "I have a director of communications!?"

This is The Current.


Canada's Role in Honduras

When the ousted President of Honduras, Manuel Zelaya, briefly set foot in his home country, it was Zelaya's latest attempt at returning to Honduras since he was forced out of power and into exile on June 28th.

Governments in Central, South and North America have all opposed Zelaya's expulsion and expressed their support for his efforts to be restored to the Presidency. Canada has also condemned the coup. But for some critics, neither Ottawa's words nor its actions have been strong enough.

Grahame Russell is one Canadian raising concerns about our position. He is a director with Rights Action, a social justice group that has been active in Central America for the past twenty-five years. He travelled to Honduras shortly after President Zelaya was deposed and spent almost three weeks there.
Grahame Russell was in Washington, D.C.

As we mentioned, one of the most prominent Canadian voices speaking about the Honduran crisis has been that of Peter Kent, Canada's Minister of State of Foreign Affairs for the Americas.

Peter Kent is the Conservative MP for Thornhill, Ontario and he was in Ottawa.

George Vallient - Feature Interview

Ah, The Good Life ... you might define it as a villa in Tuscany ... or simply being surrounded by family and friends. Either way, the good life is a lot easier to define than to achieve -- hence the massive self-help industry. But what if we could put people's lives under a microscope to understand exactly what makes a good life?

That's what Arlie Bock had in mind back in the 1930s when he was in charge of Harvard University's health services. Dr. Bock was a physician who was frustrated that medical research focused on understanding disorders and illness instead of asking what makes people happy. So he conceived of a long-term study of successful people and persuaded W.T. Grant, a department-store magnate, to bankroll it.

Two hundred and sixty-eight Harvard sophomores were recruited from the classes of 1940 through 1944 and their lives were painstakingly documented over the following seven decades in an attempt to uncover the secrets of the good life.

George Vaillant has been the study's chief investigator since 1967. He's a professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and his work has led to some surprising conjectures about the path to happiness. Dr. Vaillant was in Cambridge, Massachussets.

Music

Artist: Al Green
Cut: "Love and Happiness"
Album: Love and Happiness: The Very Best of Al Green
Label: Musicrama

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