CBCradio

July 27, 2009

Pt 1: Our Relationship with Garbage - About 24,000 civic workers walked off the job on June 22, including garbage collectors, water and sewer workers, and city-run daycare providers. But it's the issue of garbage -- how much of it we make and where we put it -- that has received the most attention.

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Pt 2: Fame - Documentary - From Susan Boyle to Michael Jackson, you'd think we'd all have our heads around this whole fame thing by now

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It's Monday, July 27th.

The deadly Black Widow Spider has been spotted lurking in the greater Toronto area.

Currently, Mayor David Miller says not to worry, as the rabid rats multiplying in the city's temporary dumps should devour them all. Barring that, the plague-carrying fleas will surely finish them off.

This is The Current.


Our Relationship with Garbage

About 24,000 civic workers walked off the job on June 22, including garbage collectors, water and sewer workers, and city-run daycare providers. But it's the issue of garbage -- how much of it we make and where we put it -- that has received the most attention.

With no curb-side pick-up for more than a month now, some residents have resorted to storing trash in their freezers or sneaking it into friends' apartment buildings that use private waste-removal companies. Others are simply piling the stuff on their front porches, in their garages or in parks and parking lots that have been designated by the city as temporary dump sites.

Update

Well, apparently the slack is going to be picked up and so is the garbarge. There was word this morning about a tentaive agreement between the city and it's unions. CBC Radio's Priya Sankaran where the negotiations have been going on, Priya:

Priya Sankaran at the Delta Hotel in Scarborough, with word that the civic workers strike appears to be over. They walked off the job on June 22, including garbage collectors, water and sewer workers, and city-run daycare providers. But it's the issue of garbage and how much of it we make and where we put it, really, that's recieved most of the attention during this strike.

Panel

For their thoughts on our modern relationship with garbage -- and what it tells us about who we are -- I am joined by two guests. Andrew Nisker is a documentary-maker who created the film Garbage: the Revolution Starts at Home and he was in Pointe au Baril, Ontario. Karen von Hahn is a style columnist with the Globe and Mail. She was in Toronto.

We also heard from David Pellow, a professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota. He the author of Garbage Wars: The Struggle for Environmental Justice in Chicago.

Vancouver's Jenny Rustemeyer also spoke with The Current. She is a co-founder of the Clean Bin Project. She and her roomates managed to produce just one bag of garbage between the three of them over one whole year.

Music

Artist: Pete Seeger
Cut: "Garbage"
Album: Pete
Label: Living Music

Fame - Documentary

From Susan Boyle to Michael Jackson, you'd think we'd all have our heads around this whole fame thing by now.

But this morning, we have a story about a very different kind of fame. It's what some people are calling "the new fame" or "e-fame", the kind that can come to anyone ... even to a teenager in Fredericton, New Brunswick who -- for a an Internet minute -- was known all over the world.

The CBC's Shaun Waters produced a documentary about that teenager. It's called Fame 15.0. It first aired on The Current in February.

Music

Artist: Irene Cara
Cut: "Fame"
Album: Fame Soundtrack
Label: Polydor

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