CBCradio

June 8, 2009

Pt 1: Forestry Bailout - About 200 workers at the Fraser Papers sulphite mill in Edmundston, New Brunswick may very well be starting their last shift this morning. The mill usually closes down temporarily for routine maintenance around this time of year. But this year, Fraser Papers says that if its fortunes don't turn around significantly and quickly ... that shut-down could be permanent.

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Pt 2: Polar Prom - Documentary - Prom season is upon us. Across the country, high school students have been busy hunting down the perfect dress, the right tuxedo and of course fretting over who they're going to walk in the door with.

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Pt 3: Blame - Office Politics - Until last week, Jasmine MacDonnell was the press secretary for Natural Resources Minister Lisa Raitt. But then some government documents marked secret were left at a CTV office and Jasmine MacDonnell took the fall. And it raised voices in the House of Commons all last week.

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It's Monday, June 8th.

The federal information watchdog says a culture of true government transparency is still a long way off.

Currently, No one on Parliament Hill could be reached for comment to explain why.

This is The Current.

Part One: Forestry Bailout - Lazar

About 200 workers at the Fraser Papers sulphite mill in Edmundston, New Brunswick may very well be starting their last shift this morning. The mill usually closes down temporarily for routine maintenance around this time of year. But this year, Fraser Papers says that if its fortunes don't turn around significantly and quickly ... that shut-down could be permanent.

And the mill in Edmundston isn't the only one in trouble. Industry groups say 50,000 jobs have been lost and more than 250 mills have closed in the last two years. And the situation seems to be getting worse.

Thanks to a U.S. Government tax incentive known as the "black liquor subsidy," American pulp and paper companies are getting an estimated 8-Billion-dollars in government money. Canadian forestry companies say that makes it impossible for them to compete. And Jacques Martin -- the Mayor of Edmundston -- says it's time for Ottawa to level the playing field. We aired a clip of Mayor Martin speaking at the Federation of Canadian Municipalities' National Conference yesterday ... right after the Federation passed a resolution calling on Ottawa to address the challenges facing the forestry sector.

That's something Avrim Lazar would like to see too. He is the President and CEO of the Forest Products Association and he was in Ottawa.

Forestry Bailout - Milke

Despite the pain being felt across the forestry sector, Mark Milke says the federal government cannot just spend its way out of this recession. Mark Milke is the Director of Research with the Frontier Centre for Public Policy and he was in Calgary.

Polar Prom - Documentary

Prom season is upon us. Across the country, high school students have been busy hunting down the perfect dress, the right tuxedo and of course fretting over who they're going to walk in the door with.

But in Igloolik -- a small Arctic town in Nunavut -- students, parents and teachers alike are sitting back and relaxing. The town has seen the prom -- the first it has ever held -- come and go. It was a huge success and an inspiration on many levels. And that can all be traced back to an e-mail the CBC's Maureen Brosnahan received this past winter. Maureen's documentary is called Polar Prom.

Click here to see pictures from this documentary.

Blame - Office Politics

Until last week, Jasmine MacDonnell was the press secretary for Natural Resources Minister Lisa Raitt. But then some government documents marked secret were left at a CTV office and Jasmine MacDonnell took the fall. And it raised voices in the House of Commons all last week.

Natural Resources Minister Lisa Raitt says that accepting Jasmine MacDonnell's resignation demonstrates that she is taking accountability seriously. But Adam Radwanski begs to differ. He is is a member of The Globe and Mail's editorial board, as well as the Politics Editor for globeandmail.com. We aired a clip.

This is just one of the latest examples that assigning blame is a little more complicated that it first appears ... especially when you try to balance individual and instituitonal responsibility. And according to Steven Appelbaum, the repercussions of assigning blame can extend well beyond the people directly involved and ripple right through an entire workplace.

Steven Appelbaum is a Professor of Management and a Senior Research Chair in Organizational Development at the John Molson School of Business at Concordia University. And he was in Montreal.

Blame - Institution

Accepting blame, laying blame, dodging blame ... they're all things that most everyone has to confront at some point. So The Current's Natasha Dos Santos took to the streets of Toronto and asked people if they'd ever taken the fall for someone else.

Chad Lavin has spent a lot of time thinking about responsibility and why it is that we find blame so satisfying. He is a Professor of Political Science and Social, Political, Ethical and Cultural Thought at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He's also the author of The Politics of Responsibility and he was in Rochester, New York.

Last Word - I Blame You

We wanted to end the program today with a musical note about blame. Melissa McClelland is a Toronto based singer-songwriter. We gave the last word to Melissa with her song, I Blame You, from her newest album, Victoria Day.

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