CBCradio

May 29, 2009

Pt 1: Jon & Kate Plus Eight - We started this segment with some clips from the show, Jon and Kate plus eight during happier times. They are, as you may well know, the stars of their own reality television series called Jon and Kate plus eight.

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Pt 2: Women Doctors - For many Canadians, finding a family doctor may be like looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack. The experience can be unpleasant, time-consuming and often fruitless. Most people attribute that to a simple shortage of doctors.

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Pt 3: Che Guevara - It's been more than forty years since Che Guevara was executed in the jungles of Bolivia. But thanks to a single image -- one that is now reputed to be the most reproduced photograph in human history -- Che's picture has taken on a life of its own.

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Today's guest host was Bob McKeown.

It's Friday, May 29th.

The Conservative government plans to sell Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd's nuclear reactor business and privatize its Chalk River research facility.

Currently, the government explained that the private sector is much better at containing leaks than it is.

This is the Current.

Jon & Kate Plus Eight

We started this segment with some clips from the show, Jon and Kate plus eight during happier times. They are, as you may well know, the stars of their own reality television series called Jon and Kate plus eight.

For four seasons now, the show has revolved around the couple's attempts to keep their life on the rails with school-aged twins and toddler sextuplets. But these days, the family drama has become melodrama with the charge of infidelity and marital meltdown.

Last week, a record 9.8 million viewers tuned in to see that squirm-inducing season premier. And if you're into that kind of thing, the appeal of watching an already chaotic family threaten to implode for 60 minutes is pretty obvious. But according to some, the attraction of Jon and Kate also comes from the times we live in when a plummetting economy has people predisposed to be fixated on the home-front.

For their thoughts on why we're watching and what it says about these times, we were joined by David Caplan. He's a senior editor for People Magazine and he was in New York City. Sheri Parks is an associate professor of American Studies at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland. And Lisa Belkin is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, where she covers family life. She is also the author of three books, including Life's Work: Confessions of an Unbalanced Mom. She was in New York City as well.

Women Doctors

For many Canadians, finding a family doctor may be like looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack. The experience can be unpleasant, time-consuming and often fruitless. Most people attribute that to a simple shortage of doctors.

But our next guest has a different diagnosis. Dr. Mark Baerlocher is a resident radiologist at the University of Toronto and the co-author of a new paper published in the May issue of the journal Medical Education. The paper is called The Feminization of Canadian Medicine and its Impact Upon Doctor Productivity. And it makes the case that more female doctors could lead to longer wait times across this country ... in part because female doctors often work less. Dr. Mark Baerlocher was in Toronto. Carol Herbert is the Dean of the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario. Bob Evans is a professor of Economics at the University of British Colombia.

Music Bridge

Artist: Steve Dawson
Cut: CD8 "Photograph"
CD: "We Belong to the Gold Coast"
Label: Black Hen Music
Spine #: BHCD 0030

Che Guevara

It's been more than forty years since Che Guevara was executed in the jungles of Bolivia. But thanks to a single image -- one that is now reputed to be the most reproduced photograph in human history -- Che's picture has taken on a life of its own.

Know it or not, you've seen the image we're talking about. Che's face is framed in a close-up ... his eyes gaze slightly upward as if he's peering into the future ... a beret struggles to contain his flowing locks. You see it on t-shirts, banners and posters. And it's been used to sell beer, condoms, cigarettes and just about any other consumer good you can think of.

In fact, in some ways, the image of Che has eclipsed the man himself. And that's where Michael Casey comes in. He's the Buenos Aires Bureau Chief for Dow Jones Newswires and the author of Che's Afterlife: The Legacy of an Image. And he was in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Last Word - Che LaBruce

Stay with us on CBC Radio One. Q is next. And later today on The Point ... the value of showing surgery on YouTube. The Point is at 2 o'clock -- 2:30 in Newfoundland and parts of Labrador. And during the hockey play-offs you can find The National on CBC Newsworld at 9 o'clock and 10 o'clock Eastern Time.

We wanted to end the program this week with one more thought about Che Guevera's image. Bruce LaBruce is an experimental film-maker and an underground gay porn star in Toronto. In 2004, his film The Raspberry Reich premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and led to a conflict over the use of Che's image. We gave him the last word this morning to explain.

Music

Artist: The Rheostatics
Cut: CD7, "Here Comes The Image"
CD: "2067"
Label: True North Records

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