CBCradio

March 6, 2009

Pt 1: Romeo Phillion - It's been 42 years since Romeo Phillion was first accused of murdering Leopold Roy ... a firefighter who lived in Ottawa. In that time, Mr. Phillion has been tried, convicted, served 31 years in prison and spent five years on parole. Then yesterday, a remarkable thing happened. An Ontario court overturned his 1972 murder conviction and ordered a new trial.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Read more here

Pt 2: ICC Sudan - Sudanese President, Omar Hassan al-Bashir is now a wanted man. Earlier this week, the International Criminal Court issued a warrant for his arrest. He is charged with two counts of war crimes and five counts of crimes against humanity for his alleged role in the conflict in Darfur ... a conflict that has killed an estimated 300,000 people and displaced 2.7 million more.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Read more here

Pt 3: Chapter Three ... The Rise of the Real Life Superhero -Gillian's Diary: March 6th. 2009... I hear there's this new superhero movie opening today. Only none of the superheroes actually have superpowers.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Read more here

Today's guest host was Gillian Findlay


It's Friday, March 6th.

The North Korean authorities have released details of the voting procedure for the forthcoming elections.

Currently, all voters for Kim Jong il will place an X against his name, voters for other candidates will write their name address and telephone number.

This is The Current.

(Citizen Satire written by Paul Oliver, Barrie, Ontario)

Romeo Phillion

It's been 42 years since Romeo Phillion was first accused of murdering Leopold Roy ... a firefighter who lived in Ottawa. In that time, Mr. Phillion has been tried, convicted, served 31 years in prison and spent five years on parole. Then yesterday, a remarkable thing happened. An Ontario court overturned his 1972 murder conviction and ordered a new trial.

His story is unusual for a number of reasons... the case was set in motion when Romeo Phillion confessed to the killing. But then, almost as soon as Mr. Phillion had said he'd done it... he recanted.

To complicate things further police had an alibi - one that placed him at a service station far from the crime scene. That evidence never reached Romeo Phillion's lawyer... never made to court.

Romeo Phillion was in Toronto this morning. We were also joined by Romeo Phillion's sister, Simonne Snowdon and his lawyer and a director of the Association in the Defence of the Wrongly Convicted James Lockyer.

 

ICC Sudan: MSF

Sudanese President, Omar Hassan al-Bashir is now a wanted man. Earlier this week, the International Criminal Court issued a warrant for his arrest. He is charged with two counts of war crimes and five counts of crimes against humanity for his alleged role in the conflict in Darfur ... a conflict that has killed an estimated 300,000 people and displaced 2.7 million more.

But actually getting President al-Bashir to trial isn't going to be easy. We aired a clip with what Sudan's Ambassador to the United Nations, Abdalmahmoud Abdalhaleem Mohamad had to say about the arrest warrant.

Just hours after the arrest warrant for President al-Bashir was issued, the Sudanese Government started issuing a few edicts of its own. There are about a dozen humanitarian aid groups working in Darfur.

And some of them say the Sudanese Government has threatened to revoke their registrations and seize their assets and that they have been warned to leave the country within 24 hours. President al-Bashir accuses the aid groups of disrupting peace efforts in Darfur, profiting from the conflict and interfering with foreign investment.

One of the groups that's set to be expelled is Médecins Sans Frontières. Marilyn McHarg is the General Director of MSF Canada. She returned from Sudan earlier this week and she was in Toronto.

Omar al-Bashir and ICC

Luis Moreno-Ocampo is the person responsible for trying to bring President al-Bashir to justice. He is the head prosecutor for the International Criminal Court and he was in the Hague.

Mail Call - Fifth Estate

Tonight on the fifth estate on CBC Television ... Gillian Findlay will be reporting on the tragic death of Brandon Crisp. He's the teenager from Barrie, Ontario whose video game obsession made national headlines when he ran away from home after his parents took away his Xbox. His disappearance and subsequent death revealed a dark side to video-gaming culture. We'll explore it in the investigative report, "Top Gun." We aired a clip of Brandon Crisp's parents recounting their son's final days.

The Fifth Estate is on CBC Television, tonight at 9 o'clock -- 9:30 in Newfoundland and parts of Labrador.

Music Bridge

Ray Montford (more music information to be included)

 

Chapter Three ... The Rise of the Real Life Superhero

Gillian's Diary:

March 6th. 2009

I hear there's this new superhero movie opening today. Only none of the superheroes actually have superpowers.
Well, except for this Doctor Manhattan guy. Let's leave him out of this.
Because you know what? The day of the real life superhero is upon us.
The world is filling up with ordinary people who just got tired of waiting for someone else to save them
. So they pick a name ... maybe put on a mask ... and start doing what they can.
Like this guy I've been hearing about ... name of Thanatos.
Said to live in Vancouver. Only no one knows where.
So we sent Jennifer Moss to find him.

Meantime ... The drug pushers of Gotham -- that's New York City to you -- they don't know what they're in for. By day, Chris Pollack teaches martial arts to the average citizen. But under cover of night, and under cover of mask, he's Dark Guardian, crime fighting superhero. He was in New york City.

So, the very idea of the superhero. You ever wonder how far back it goes? It's one hefty riddle, but we're up for it. And the answer ... it comes from a real life legend. His name is Michael Taft. He's the Head of the Archive of Folk Culture at the Library of Congress in Washingon, D.C. And he says superheroes have ancient roots.

Real-Life Superheroes: Psychologist

Now some people, like Robin Rosenberg, they find this whole thing endlessly fascinating. In fact, she's got this idea that superheroes and the way we think about them ... tell us something about ourselves. She's a clinical psychologist. She's also written a book called The Psychology of Superheroes. And she was in Boston.

Real-Life Superheroes: Criminologist

In the academic halls of St. Thomas University, one man, a criminology professor, takes it all in. Concern might furrow his brow. Could Real-Life Superheroes fall to the dark side? Michael Boudreau wonders.

For better or worse, real life superheroes walk among us. Even in the most remote corners of the world. Like Iqaluit. That's where the CBC's Kevin Kablutsiak set out to find the legendary Polar Man

Bookmark and Share
  • Commenting has been disabled for this entry.