CBCradio

February 13, 2009

Pt 1: Sentencing Circles - A little over a year ago Christopher Pauchay turned up frost bitten, and barely conscious on a doorstep in the Yellow Quill first nation in Saskatchewan. What no one knew at the time, was that his two small daughters, dressed only in diapers and t-shirts were still outside. It was January and blistering cold. The girls' bodies were later found buried in the snow.

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Pt 2: Consortium of Pub-going, Loose and Forward Women - We started off this part of our show by setting up the scene two weeks ago at the Amnesia Lounge, a pub in the southern Indian city of Mangalore. Men belonging to a group called Sri Ram Sena -- or Army of God -- walked into the pub and attacked a group of young women inside. Sri Ram Sena has been linked to India's growing right-wing Hindu movement. And to the attackers, the women's mere presence in the pub was an affront to what they see as proper Indian culture.

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Pt 3: Love Interrupted - Documentary - Bartley Stokes and Brenda Litzo fell in love in Seattle in the fall of 1976. Bart bought a diamond ring and they planned to marry. But when Brenda became pregnant, their whole world turned upside down. They were teenagers, unaware of their legal rights and overwhelmed by parental disapproval. And they agreed to a closed adoption.

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Today's guest host was Sheila Coles in Regina.

It's Friday, February 13th.

Currently... Oh yeah, like we really need a Friday the 13th right now.

This is the Current.


Sentencing Circles

A little over a year ago Christopher Pauchay turned up frost bitten, and barely conscious on a doorstep in the Yellow Quill first nation in Saskatchewan. What no one knew at the time, was that his two small daughters, dressed only in diapers and t-shirts were still outside. It was January and blistering cold. The girls' bodies were later found buried in the snow.

Their father was charged with, and pleaded guilty to criminal negligence causing death. Today, Christopher Pauchay stands not before judge and jury, but before members of his community in an aboriginal sentencing circle. It has sparked a lot of discussion about when sentencing circles should and should not be held.
But it's not the first case to raise this question.

A year and a half ago, aboriginal activist Nora Bernard was brutally murdered in her home on the Millbrook First Nation near Truro, Nova Scotia. Her drug-addicted grandson was convicted of manslaughter. At one point, a sentencing circle was being considered in his case. That didn't sit well with Nora Bernard's sister, Mathilda.

Sentencing Circles In-Depth

For more perspective on how sentencing circles should, or shouldn't be used, Sheila joined by Claude Fafar. He is the judge who brought sentencing circles to Saskatchewan 15 years ago. He's now retired and we reached him at his farm near Rocanville, Saskatchewan.

Barry Stuart was the first judge in Canada to implement a sentencing circle. Barry Stuart is now a retired judge and he was in Vancouver for the show.

 

India - Consortium of Pub-going, Loose and Forward Women

We started off this part of our show by setting up the scene two weeks ago at the Amnesia Lounge, a pub in the southern Indian city of Mangalore. Men belonging to a group called Sri Ram Sena -- or Army of God -- walked into the pub and attacked a group of young women inside. Sri Ram Sena has been linked to India's growing right-wing Hindu movement. And to the attackers, the women's mere presence in the pub was an affront to what they see as proper Indian culture.

Mangalore is a college town and an I.T. and call-centre hub - not the kind of place you'd expect an attack like this to happen. And yet the perpetrators were brazen enough to contact local television stations in advance to invite them to film the attack. But women like Nisha Susan aren't backing down in the face of it. She's a journalist and founding member of the provocatively named group called Consortium of Pub-Going, Loose and Forward Women. She was in Delhi for the show.

 

Love Interrupted - Documentary

Bartley Stokes and Brenda Litzo fell in love in Seattle in the fall of 1976. Bart bought a diamond ring and they planned to marry. But when Brenda became pregnant, their whole world turned upside down. They were teenagers, unaware of their legal rights and overwhelmed by parental disapproval. And they agreed to a closed adoption.

Thirty years ago, a closed adoption meant giving up all ties to your child. They didn't know it then, but the only way they could ever see their son again was if he wanted to see them. Losing their son was devastating and drove them apart. It was a loss that would take them decades to resolve.

Alison Armstrong brings us their story this morning in a documentary called, Love Interrupted: Lost and Found.

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Last Word

Earlier this week, eight of the top bankers in the United States met with a hostile Congress to explain what they had done with the billions of taxpayer dollars used to bail them out. Much of that money was supposed to go to new lending. But according to the Neighbourhood Assistance Corporation of America -- or NACA -- that's not happening fast enough to help millions of Americans facing foreclosure on their homes. In some cases, NACA has stepped in to negotiate better payment terms for struggling homeowners. And when that hasn't worked it has tried a different approach. Last weekend hundreds of homeowners, organized by NACA, converged on the mansions of wealthy bankers in one exclusive neighbourhood in Connecticut.

We'll leave you with some of the sounds from that protest and a word of explanation from NACA's CEO, Bruce Marks.

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