CBCradio

January 02, 2009

Pt 1: Economy Panel - Chances are you've been wished a happy new year several times by now. Well, we're probably going to take the stuffing out of that holiday cheer now by talking about the economy and what the coming year holds in store twelve months in which we'll find out a lot more about the lasting impact of a housing market that's cratered, bank bailouts, an auto sector on life support, oil prices in the tank, a stock market meltdown, evaporating jobs and government stimulus plans. No one seems to question whether we're in a recession, only how bad, how deal and how long it will be.

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Pt 2: Charlotte Gordon - For dramatic potential, it's hard to beat the love triangle. Whether it's Charles, Diana and Camilla or Brad Pitt , Angelina Jolie and Jennifer Aniston, the love triangle serves up both tabloid tawdriness and an operatic emotional range spanning betrayal and pathos, spite and sorrow.

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Pt 3: Two documentaries on the Philippines - Think of Canada's role in the global economy, and you're likely to think of exports oil, wheat, potash, nickel and other minerals and, once upon a time, cars.

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It's Friday, January 2nd.

A Private research group says consumer confidence in the United States hit an all time low in December.

Currently, outgoing president George Bush wishes he had four more years to fix the economy.

This is The Current.


Economy Panel - Looking Ahead

Chances are you've been wished a happy new year several times by now. Well, we're probably going to take the stuffing out of that holiday cheer now by talking about the economy and what the coming year holds in store twelve months in which we'll find out a lot more about the lasting impact of a housing market that's cratered, bank bailouts, an auto sector on life support, oil prices in the tank, a stock market meltdown, evaporating jobs and government stimulus plans. No one seems to question whether we're in a recession, only how bad, how deal and how long it will be.

So with the annus horibilis of 2008 in the rear view mirror, and 2009 lying in the wait, Tom Harrington was joined by Charles Cirtwill, the Executive Vice President of the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies in Halifax. In Calgary, we have Todd Hirsch, senior economist with ATB Financial. And with me in Toronto, Armine Yalnizyan, senior economist with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

 

Charlotte Gordon - Feature Interview

For dramatic potential, it's hard to beat the love triangle. Whether it's Charles, Diana and Camilla or Brad Pitt , Angelina Jolie and Jennifer Aniston, the love triangle serves up both tabloid tawdriness and an operatic emotional range spanning betrayal and pathos, spite and sorrow.

Well, Brangelina and Jennifer have nothing on the Biblical story of Abraham, Sarah and Hagar. Three people caught in a wrenching love triangle, one involving a barren woman, a miraculous birth, a jealous woman and a woman and a woman spurned... and two children whose progeny would become the stuff of an epic sibling rivalry. It's rue, there are those who worship Brad Pitt, but Abraham and his sons fathered three major world religions. Christianity, Judaism and islam all look to the story of Abraham, Sarah and Hagar for their origins, a story that has profoundly shaped world history.

Charlotte Gordon is an English professor at Endicott University in Beverly, Massachusetts who explores this saga in her forthcoming book, The Woman who Named God. Charlotte Gordon was in Boston for the show.

 

Two documentaries on the Philippines

Think of Canada's role in the global economy, and you're likely to think of exports oil, wheat, potash, nickel and other minerals and, once upon a time, cars.

The Philippines, on the other hand, is a country that exports people. Highly trained poeple encouraged by the government to look for work abroad, send home money to help support their familiesand help fill the country's coffers. The Philippines has been essentially renting out its people -- sending them on what's become known as The Big Commute -- for more than 30 years. And one of the biggest importers is Canada. This morning we bring you two documentaries out of the Philippines. Karin Wells is a documentary Producer with CBC Radio, who travelled to Manila earlier this year. First, we'll play her documentary, The Big Commute.

In the second half of this part, you here a follow up to Karen Well's first documentary.

No country exports more workers per capita than the Philipines. But their are consequences when a country spends decades sending its best and brighters young workers abroad. That's what Karin explores in her second documentary this morning. It's called, Two Years Will Do.

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