CBCradio

September 3, 2008

Pt 1: Meet the Bow River - In Southern Alberta the Bow River is a crucial source of water, used in one of the driest parts of the country. In this special edition of The Current, we followed the Bow River because it's journey is emblematic of the water issues that are moving to centre stage in Canada and beyond.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Pt 2: Water Markets - In part two we heard more sounds of the industrial strength side of the Bow, southern Alberta's majestic river, which we began following in our first half hour.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Pt 3: Water Panel - For the better part of this espisode, we were knee-deep in the Bow River. After spending nearly an hour talking about water in Alberta without even mentioning the oil sands, here are a few more thoughts from people we've already heard from today about the decisions we make about water.

Download Flash Player to view this content.



It's Wednesday, September 3rd.

John McCain's campaign says Sarah Palin was fully and properly screened before she was added to the Republican ticket.

Currently, they say her daughter's pregnancy did come as a bit of a surprise, but the real shocker was finding out that Sarah Palin is a woman.

This is The Current.


Meet the Bow River

In Southern Alberta the Bow River is a crucial source of water, used in one of the driest parts of the country. In this special edition of The Current, we followed the Bow River because it's journey is emblematic of the water issues that are moving to centre stage in Canada and beyond.

The Bow Lake is the source of the the river, and this is precisely where we began our first segment for our Watershed series.

It was the peak of Summer and Anna Maria Tremonti froze her toes in the glacial waters of Bow Lake with Shawn Marshall, a glaciologist from the Unversity of Calgary.

Bob Sandford, the Chair of the Canadian Partnership Initiative, which supports the United Nations Water for Life program, worldwide, later walked with Anna Maria alongside the flood chanel of the Bow River. Bob Sandford is also an author and naturalist.

And moving east, Anna Maria joined Danielle Droitsch, the founder of Bow Riverkeeper, which has been set up to protect the Bow. She is now the Executive Director of Water Matters.


Water Markets

In part two we heard more sounds of the industrial strength side of the Bow, southern Alberta's majestic river, which we began following in our first half hour.

It trickles down from glaciers, gushes through the mountains and meanders through the foothills and into the prairie to Calgary.The Current had a raft of experts waiting to bow to the Bow, but first where the current, meets the currency.

Anna Maria brought us to the Bearspaw water treatment plant on the Bow River. Paul Fesko, manager of strategic services for the city of Calgary Water Department, spoke to our host about the limits of these waters.

Michael O'Halloran is The Current's producer in Calgary joined us in conversation about this tug of war over water.

And Jim Webber, a water engineer and the general manager of the Western Irrigation District, joined Anna Maria on this journey at the Secondary 'A' canal, where he shared his in own insights on the issue.

Water Panel

For the better part of this espisode, we were knee-deep in the Bow River . After spending nearly an hour talking about water in Alberta without even mentioning the oil sands, here are a few more thoughts from people we've already heard from today about the decisions we make about water.

You will hear the voices of Jim Webber, Danielle Droitsch and Bob Sandford.

They may not agree on everything. But they agree on this much -- Alberta has waited too long to plan for a dryer future. And the rest of Canada probably isn't as flush with freshwater as we like to think.

For their thoughts on where we go from here, we were joined by Lorne Taylor. He was Alberta's Environment Minister from 2001 to 2004. He's now the Chair of the Alberta Water Research Institute. he joined us from Kimberly, British Columbia.

And Meera Karunananthan also joined the conversation. She is the National Water Campaigner for the Council of Canadians and she joined us from Ottawa.


Last Word:

We let a river run right through to the end of this edition of The Current. We left you with a much-loved song by Saskatchewan native Joni Mitchell. It's called River. And if you're still trying to hold on to what's left of the summer, please ignore the song's references to Christmas.

Bookmark and Share
  • Commenting has been disabled for this entry.