CBCradio

August 27, 2008

Pt 1: Democratic Convention - And with that speech behind him, Barack Obama is now just one Clinton away from finally taking centre stage. Last night, at the Democratic Party's National Convention in Denver, Colorado, Hillary Clinton dutifully lined up behind Senator Obama and encouraged the 18 million people who backed her campaign for the Democratic nomination to follow suit. Her husband, Bill Clinton will speak at the convention tonight, presumably adding his name to a long list of Democratic heavyweights all calling -- some pleading -- for unity. But despite all that, a poll released yesterday found that only 66 per cent of Hillary Clinton's supporters would back Obama ... and that 27 per cent of them would instead vote for John McCain, the presumed Republican nominee.

Read more here

Pt 2: Rising from the Ashes - Documentary - Two years ago, a tiny, peasant-run radio station called Radio Cagayano went on the air in the Philippines. It was meant to give voice to the concerns of some of the country's poorest people. But it didn't last long. Within months, the station was raided by armed men and burnt to the ground. The station's organizers blamed the Philippine military. The military accused Radio Cagayano of being a front for communist insurgents. And two years later, the fight over Radio Cagayano is far from over. Kim Kierens traveled to the Philippines and prepared this documentary. It's called Rising From The Ashes and it first aired on The Current in October.

Read more here


Satire

It's Wednesday, August 27th.

After opposing it for years, Major League Baseball will begin using instant replays to check home run calls tomorrow.

Currently, and upon further review, Hillary Clinton has in fact lost the Democratic nomination for President.

This is The Current.


Democratic Convention

And with that speech behind him, Barack Obama is now just one Clinton away from finally taking centre stage. Last night, at the Democratic Party's National Convention in Denver, Colorado, Hillary Clinton dutifully lined up behind Senator Obama and encouraged the 18 million people who backed her campaign for the Democratic nomination to follow suit. Her husband, Bill Clinton will speak at the convention tonight, presumably adding his name to a long list of Democratic heavyweights all calling -- some pleading -- for unity. But despite all that, a poll released yesterday found that only 66 per cent of Hillary Clinton's supporters would back Obama ... and that 27 per cent of them would instead vote for John McCain, the presumed Republican nominee.

CBC Radio's Michael Enright has been watching the saga unfold from the convention floor in Denver and he joined us for the show.

Now that's a flash from the past - George McGovern accepting the Democratic Party's Presidential nomination on August 25th, 1972. Many observers have pointed to what they see as parallels between his run for the Presidency and Barack Obama's. Of course, McGovern went on to lose the 1972 election by a landslide to Richard Nixon. So Democrats are being cautious about the comparison.

Regardless, George McGovern now finds himself 36 years later at another Democratic Convention, assessing another candidate's chances with a campaign based on change.The Current spoke to George McGovern as well.


Listen to Part One:

 

Rising from the Ashes - Documentary

Two years ago, a tiny, peasant-run radio station called Radio Cagayano went on the air in the Philippines. It was meant to give voice to the concerns of some of the country's poorest people. But it didn't last long. Within months, the station was raided by armed men and burnt to the ground. The station's organizers blamed the Philippine military. The military accused Radio Cagayano of being a front for communist insurgents. And two years later, the fight over Radio Cagayano is far from over. Kim Kierens traveled to the Philippines and prepared this documentary. It's called Rising From The Ashes and it first aired on The Current in October.

That documentary was prepared by Kim Kierens and it first aired on The Current last October. Since then there have been reports that the Philippine military has stepped up its intimidation of peasant farmers. Attempts to rebuild Radio Cagayano have stalled, but organizers say they hope to buy a portable "radio in a suitcase" and begin broadcasting to the community that way. And the Commission on Human Rights is still refusing to investigate the fire that gutted the original station.


Listen to Part Two:

Bookmark and Share
  • Commenting has been disabled for this entry.