CBCradio

May 26, 2008

Pt 1: Memorial Day 2008 - The 2008 Memorial Day parade, in its fifth year, was scheduled to include war re-enactors, active duty units, high school bands, and even the star of CSI: New York, Gary Sinise.

Read more here

Pt 2: National Day of Healing and Reconciliation - May 26, 2008 has been called a National Day of Healing and Reconciliation, marked by community events across Canada, including healing circles, feasts, walks, and church services.

Read more here

Pt 3:Is the World Safer With a Republican in the White House? - America's place in the world, its reputation and its relationships with other nations may undergo a significant if not seismic shift depending on who takes the seat in the White House come January 2009.

Read more here

Satire

It's Monday, May 26th.

Despite being cleared for his role in NAFTAgate, the Prime Minister's chief of staff , Ian Brodie, plans to resign. It was Brodie's offhand comments about Barack Obama's NAFTA policy that some say cost the Illinois Senator the Ohio primary.

Currently, Brodie now plans to spend more time with his family and as a super delegate for Hillary Clinton.

This is The Current.


Memorial Day 2008

Veterans For Peace


The 2008 Memorial Day parade, in its fifth year, was scheduled to include war re-enactors, active duty units, high school bands, and even the star of CSI: New York, Gary Sinise.

But one group not invited to march down Constitution Avenue was Veterans for Peace, composed of former soldiers opposing the war in Iraq. After an initial approval of its application to march in the parade, the Veterans for Peace was stunned when its invitation was rescinded. The Reason: The organization was deemed too political.

Michael Marceau, Vice President of the Veterans for Peace DC chapter 16, joined us from Washington.


Howard Zinn

There is something about the Memorial Day Holiday in the United States that makes people particularly sensitive to the politics of dissent.

In 1976, author Howard Zinn had his bi-weekly column in the Boston Globe cancelled after the publication of his editorial Whom Will We Honor Memorial Day?
Howard Zinn is best known as the author of A People's History of the United States and he joined us from Auburndale, Massachusetts.


Origins of Memorial Day

For most Americans, Memorial Day is about marking past and present wars -- and, of course, a three-day weekend. But the origins of the holiday go back to the bloodiest days of American history.

To tell us about the story of the holiday's origins was Caroline Janney, a professor of history at Purdue University and the author of Burying the Dead but Not the Past: Ladies' Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause. She was in West Lafayette, Indiana.


Listen to Part One:

 

Documentary


National Day of Healing and Reconciliation

May 26, 2008 has been called a National Day of Healing and Reconciliation, marked by community events across Canada, including healing circles, feasts, walks, and church services.

The day is based on Australia's national 'Sorry Day,' a day set aside to acknowledge the injustices done to that country's aboriginal people.

But for many of Canada's First Nation's people, before the healing can begin, they must first reconcile a dark history.

Winnipeg CBC reporter Karen Pauls has been talking to two men from two very different backgrounds who are living in the shadow of their pasts. Mike Pinay is a former student of the Lebret Indian Residential School in Saskatchewan, and Guy Blondeau was a teacher and principal at the school.


Music

Artist: Twelve Girls Band
CD: Romantic Energy
Cut: CD3, "River Shule"
Label: Domo Records


Listen to Part Two: 

 

Is the World Safer With a Republican in the White House?


Panel: Niall Ferguson and Johnathan Schell

America's place in the world, its reputation and its relationships with other nations may undergo a significant if not seismic shift depending on who takes the seat in the White House come January 2009.

To debate what lies ahead for this hyperpower under a new president, we were joined by two people: internationally-renowned historian Niall Ferguson is a foreign policy advisor to Republican presidential nominee Senator John McCain, the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University author of The War of the World, and a participant in The Munk Debates, to argue the pro side of this statement: The World is a Safer Place with a Republican in the White House. Naill Ferguson joined us in our Toronto studio.

And Jonathan Schell is a Fellow at the Nation Institute and a visiting lecturer in international studies at Yale University and author of The Seventh Decade: The New Shape of the Nuclear Danger. Jonathan Schell joined us from New York.


Last Word - Ron Kovic

Earlier on the program we spoke with a US war veteran about the oil-and-water nature of political activism and Memorial Day in the United States, and few vets are as well known or as politically engaged as the legendary US anti-war activist Ron Kovic, author of Born on the Fourth of July.

He fought in Vietnam and received injuries that left him in a wheelchair before going on to be one of the loudest and most articulate critics of US military intervention first in South East Asia and, eventually, in Iraq.

We closed this episode with Ron Kovic, leading protestors in song at a peace rally in Los Angeles on October 28th, 2006.


Listen to Part Three:

Bookmark and Share
  • Commenting has been disabled for this entry.