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May 19, 2008

Pt 1: Why Happiness Matters - May 19, 2008 was a national, statutory holiday, and the unofficial start of summer, with banks closed and cottages opening. Campsites and picnic tables everywhere are being staked out. And keen gardeners were already up to their elbows in dirt.graph

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Pt 2: Residential School Teacher - For many years, Florence Kaefer didn't like to tell people where she had once worked. She was a teacher at two Indian Residential Schools. And given the history at many of those schools, people often made the assumption that she had been an abuser. She wasn't. In fact in most cases, the abuse occurred in the dormitories, and classrooms like the one Florence Kaefer ran were relative safe havens.

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Pt 3: "Happy Day" - The police refer to it as "Happy Day." It's the day in court when the victim of a crime gets to hear the word"guilty." But it is often a long and tortuous road to get to "Happy Day," if that day ever comes at all. The CBC's Mary Lynk produced a documentary about a woman -- the victim of a brutal attack -- in search of her own happy day; in search of peace. Mary joined us from Halifax.

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Satire

It's Monday, May 19th.

United States intelligence agencies are renewing their efforts to build trust among new immigrants and to recruit people who speak Arabic, Farsi and Pashtu.

Currently, as a gesture of good faith, there will be strict limits on waterboarding.

This is The Current.


Why Happiness Matters

Arthur Brooks


May 19, 2008 was a national, statutory holiday, and the unofficial start of summer, with banks closed and cottages opening. Campsites and picnic tables everywhere are being staked out. And keen gardeners were already up to their elbows in dirt.

Most Canadians didn't have to work this Victoria Day Monday. Instead, they got a chance to kick back and enjoy some precious leisure time. We offered some samples of how some Canadians planned to spend the day. They all sounded pretty happy.

But Arthur Brooks isn't convinced. He's the author of the new book, Gross National Happiness: Why Happiness Matters for America and How We Can Get More of It. Among other things, he argues that work makes us happier than leisure ever can. He joined us from Washington.


Listen to Part One:

 

Feature Interview


Residential School Teacher

For many years, Florence Kaefer didn't like to tell people where she had once worked. She was a teacher at two Indian Residential Schools. And given the history at many of those schools, people often made the assumption that she had been an abuser. She wasn't. In fact in most cases, the abuse occurred in the dormitories, and classrooms like the one Florence Kaefer ran were relative safe havens.

Over the years, as the horrific stories of abuse at the residential schools became public, Florence Kaefer had to learn to come to terms with her role in those schools. And she ended up reconnecting with some of the students she had taught decades earlier. Florence Kaefer will be attending the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings into the Indian Residential Schools. And she joined us from Courtenay on Vancouver Island.


Listen to Part Two: 

 

 Documentary and Last Word


"Happy Day"


The police refer to it as "Happy Day." It's the day in court when the victim of a crime gets to hear the word"guilty." But it is often a long and tortuous road to get to "Happy Day," if that day ever comes at all. The CBC's Mary Lynk produced a documentary about a woman -- the victim of a brutal attack -- in search of her own happy day; in search of peace. Mary joined us from Halifax.


Last Word - Happy Day

We began this episode by talking about what makes us happy with Arthur Brooks, the author of Gross National Happiness. So we thought we'd close the show on the same theme: Al Green with his soulful classic, Love and Happiness.


Listen to Part Three:

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