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Thanks! And let's talk again in September...

photo credit: <a href='http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/4759535950/'>woodleywonderworks</a>

photo credit: woodleywonderworks

Hi everyone,
Thank You for taking time to listen to The 180 over this season, and for all the feedback you sent by email, tweets and online posts.
We hope you have a fantastic Summer, and that you'll join us again this Fall!
We'll be back in our new time slot, Sunday mornings at 11:00, starting September 7, 2014 Yours,
The 180 Team
Geoff, Jim, Karen, and Kathryn

Thanks! And let's talk again in September...

Hi everyone,
Thank You for taking time to listen to The 180 over this season, and for all the feedback you sent by email, tweets and online posts.
We hope you have a fantastic Summer, and that you'll join us again this Fall!
We'll be back in our new time slot, Sunday mornings at 11:00, starting September 7, 2014 Yours,
The 180 Team
Geoff, Jim, Karen, and Kathryn

What are Kitimat residents saying about the Northern Gateway decision?

What are Kitimat residents saying about the Northern Gateway decision?
All season, we've been looking at oil and gas projects in our series "All Roads Lead to Kitimat." With the federal government giving the green light for at least one of those roads, Northern Gateway, we wanted to see what people were saying in the terminus town. It was just two months ago, after all, that Kitimat residents rejected the project in a non-binding plebiscite. Jim spoke with Patricia Lange and Tim Rice for their reaction.

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Northern Gateway Decision, Road tolls, Two-tier healthcare

Northern Gateway Decision, Road tolls, Two-tier healthcare
On this episode we wrap up our "All Roads Lead to Kitimat" series with extended reaction to the federal government's approval of the Northern Gateway pipeline proposal. Jim's guests also discuss the merits of road pricing, make the case that two-tiered health care could save lives, and explain how a new bill could keep politicians honest. 

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What if politicians risked their pensions if convicted of a crime?

What if politicians risked their pensions if convicted of a crime?
The mayor of London, Ontario was convicted of fraud this week. Joe Fontana is a former Member of Parliament, and says he'll resign his new post because of the charges.
But current MP John Williamson (Conservative, New Brunswick Southwest) would like to see federal politicians in Fontana's situation stripped of their pensions.
He's tabled a private members' bill called the "Protecting Taxpayers and Revoking Pensions of Convicted Politicians Act."
On this week's show he'll tell Jim why it's needed now, more than ever.

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Should Canadian cities start charging drivers to use their roads?

Should Canadian cities start charging drivers to use their roads?
A number of Canadian cities will head to the polls in the next few months, and traffic and transit will be top of mind for many voters.
If commuters and politicians can agree on what to do to fight congestion on the streets, settling on how to pay for those improvements seems to be a tougher task.
In B.C., the mayors of Metro Vancouver have determined that road pricing--a system of user fees, tolls or levies--should be part of the solution.
In this week's episode, columnist Andrew Coyne makes the case for road pricing in Canadian cities.

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