Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Net neutrality again before the House

By Paul Jay, CBC News.ca.

New Democrat digital affairs critic Charlie Angus has tabled another bill designed to enshrine the principle of net neutrality, his second attempt to bring the issue to the House of Commons through a private member's bill.

Bill C-398 will “ensure the future development of the internet is not impeded by unfair throttling or interference by telecom giants” the NDP said in a release Friday.

Angus introduced an earlier private member's bill, C-552, last year (eerily, on almost exactly the same day) that didn't get past first reading before it and other bills (including the Conservative government's first crack at copyright reform) all fell by the wayside when the election was called for the fall.

But the timing of this bill is interesting, because it comes about a month before the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission is set to hold hearings on issues of net neutrality, such as the internet service provider practices of traffic shaping and throttling. And it also comes about a week after small ISPs appealed a CRTC ruling on Bell Canada's throttling.

As Angus said in a prepared statement: “"The telecom giants didn't invent the internet. They don't own the internet and they shouldn't be able to use their position as service providers to give priority to their own content."

Once we get a hold of the bill itself, we'll see how it differs from last year's bill and keep you in the loop about what, if anything, might come from this latest salvo.

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

This discussion is now Open. Submit your Comment.

Comments

Brett Glass

Wyoming

The consequences of this bill would be catastrophic for small, independent, rural, and competitive ISPs. It would destroy these vital competitors, leaving virtually all locales with a monopoly or at best a duopoly. What's more, it's a "solution" to a problem which does not exist.

ISPs are not interested in discriminating against content, nor against particular application or content providers. But because a network is by definition a shared medium, they MUST be able to stop types of behavior which harm the network or hog resources. And they must do it BEFORE it develops into "extraordinary congestion" which cripples the network. They also must ensure that the network remains financially sustainable, which does mean that they must be able to prevent a user from consuming more costly resources than he or she is paying for. These resources include Internet backbone bandwidth, "last mile" bandwidth, and wireless spectrum.

For these reasons, this bill is a very bad idea. Instead of regulating ISPs and the Internet, government should encourage competition and prohibit anticompetitive practices. Then, if users don't like an ISP's network management practices, they can simply switch to one they like better.

Posted May 30, 2009 12:17 PM

Sean

Vancouver

It's about -expletive- time. As a songwriter and an avid contributor and watcher of internet "TV", I'm fed up with my ISP throttling my rights. I watch LEGAL shows, enjoy creating media with my friends, and have had enough of Telus, Shaw, Rogers, Bell...slowing my access to a trickle, all the while, they're advertising HUGE download speeds! I checked the facts, and there's absolutely NO reason they should route traffic. They're creating an ARTIFICIAL scarcity, so they force people to buy premium bandwidth.

Posted May 31, 2009 06:57 PM

James Ryan

Brett, please stop spreading misconceptions about this issue.

The fact is that net neutrality has *nothing* to do with preventing ISP's from controlling how much bandwidth they sell to their customers. It is about preventing ISP's from going BEYOND bandwidth allocation in order to charge different rates for different types of content or the source or origin of that content. As a consumer, if I pay for a 6Mbps ADSL connection, I should GET that without consideration for what the content I access using that bandwidth actually is. And as the owner of a web site, I refuse to pay an extra fee beyond the bandwidth that I use based on some arbitrary determination by a corporate opportunist that I should pay more for being too popular. Claiming I could "easily" switch ISP's is either naive or intentionally disingenuous because as anyone who runs a site knows, it costs time and effort to switch hosting providers. Ban net neutrality and that time and effort becomes a weapon ISP's can use to bludgeon their customers with if they fail to pay to "protect" the bandwidth they already paid for.

Simply: If an ISP cannot provide all their customers the bandwidth they sold them, no matter what the medium (ADSL, wireless, etc) then they should *NOT BE SELLING THEM THAT BANDWIDTH*. This is not a difficult concept to understand.

Posted June 4, 2009 01:08 PM

Mitch

Alberta

@Brett Glass
You could not be more wrong with what you said. I agree completely with James Ryan on this one.

Posted June 5, 2009 12:25 PM

Brett Glass

Wyoming

James says, "As a consumer, if I pay for a 6Mbps ADSL connection, I should GET that without consideration for what the content I access using that bandwidth actually is."

It's not a matter of content; no ISP has censored legal content or wants to.

What matters is the user's behavior on the network, which -- regardless of medium -- is a shared resource. You don't, I'm sure, want your service to be degraded or slowed to a crawl because the neighbor's kid is downloading illegal copies of music or movies via BitTorrent. That's why your ISP needs to rein in that software -- which exploits technical flaws in TCP/IP, the protocol that runs the Internet -- to keep your quality of service up to snuff. The so-called "network neutrality" regulations would force ISPs not to do this -- thus, ironically, making the network non-"neutral".

As for getting the bandwidth that one pays for if you look closely at the contract (or even the fine print in the advertising) of any cable or DSL provider, you'll see that you are not guaranteed any particular speed... or, in fact, any speed at all.

Unfortunately, "network neutrality" regulation would prevent ISPs from prioritizing traffic, blocking exploitation of the network by P2Pers who want to take it over, or engineering our network for the best performance. As a consumer, you wouldn't want it. Prices would be higher; quality of service would be worse (not better); many small ISPs would fold because they couldn't break even with the regulatory millstone around their necks (leaving you with no one to switch to if you don't like the cable or telephone company). Don't fall for the lobbyists' propaganda. Remember, they all work for corporations -- not for the consumer.

Posted October 4, 2009 10:32 PM

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

Post a Comment

Disclaimer:

Note: By submitting your comments you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that due to the volume of e-mails we receive, not all comments will be published, and those that are published will not be edited. But all will be carefully read, considered and appreciated.

Note: Due to volume there will be a delay before your comment is processed. Your comment will go through even if you leave this page immediately afterwards.

Privacy Policy | Submissions Policy

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

World »

Updated ISIS 'capital of terrorism' Raqqa falls to Syrian forces
A commander with the U.S.-backed Syrian forces battling ISIS says the city of Raqqa has been liberated from militants and that combing operations are underway to clear the city of land mines and extremist sleeper cells.
WATCH Freed hostage Joshua Boyle on why he went to Afghanistan and what his kidnappers wanted video
In an interview with CBC News, Joshua Boyle describes his kidnappers’ apparent motives, the conditions of his confinement with his family and the final moments of their rescue on Wednesday, five years after being taken hostage in Afghanistan by a Taliban-linked militant group.
'People turned into charcoal': Somali-Canadians recount horror of Mogadishu attack
Harrowing stories are emerging of Canadians and their friends on the ground in Mogadishu, following Saturday's bombing attack that killed at least 300 people.
more »

Canada »

WATCH Freed hostage Joshua Boyle on why he went to Afghanistan and what his kidnappers wanted video
In an interview with CBC News, Joshua Boyle describes his kidnappers’ apparent motives, the conditions of his confinement with his family and the final moments of their rescue on Wednesday, five years after being taken hostage in Afghanistan by a Taliban-linked militant group.
What you need to know about Quebec's religious neutrality law, set to pass today
A bill that requires people in Quebec who give or receive any public service to uncover their faces is expected to become law today, but many important details still need to be crafted, and its implications may be decided by the courts
Bombardier to partner with Airbus on CSeries program
Bombardier Inc. has announced it has sold a majority stake in its CSeries passenger jet business to European aerospace giant Airbus for no cost.
more »

Politics »

NAFTA rounds to last longer, plans in the works to negotiate past new year deadline, source says
North America Free Trade Agreement talks are now expected to blow past the new year deadline that U.S. and Mexican negotiators had hoped to meet.
Analysis Liberals turn to pasta to move past 3 months of fuss and fury over tax fairness video
Perhaps — three months after launching their consultation on "tax fairness" — the Liberals have now landed on a set of policy proposals that can be safely implemented.
Veterans ombudsman says more ex-soldiers will need assisted living help
Canada's veterans ombudsman says the Liberal government should overhaul the program meant to keep elderly ex-soldiers in their homes. Guy Parent released a new report that says the eligibility for the often-maligned veterans independence program are inflexible.
more »

Health »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Arts & Entertainment»

Women identify as assault, harassment victims using #metoo hashtag
Thousands of women are responding to actress Alyssa Milano's call to share #metoo on social media to raise awareness of sexual harassment and assault following the recent revelation of decades of alleged sexual misconduct by movie mogul Harvey Weinstein.
John Dunsworth, Mr. Lahey on Trailer Park Boys, dead at 71 video audio
John Dunsworth, a Nova Scotia actor best known as the irreverent trailer park supervisor Jim Lahey, has died at the age of 71.
WWE signs first woman wrestler from Arab world in global push
World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. signed its first female performer from the Arab world on Sunday, smashing cultural taboos as the U.S.-based pageant seeks to piledrive its way into lucrative foreign markets.
more »

Technology & Science »

Disability in demand: People with autism offer employers a broader talent pool
A Danish company with a global mandate to help employers make the most of untapped autistic talent is helping North American firms make concerted efforts to hire employees with autism who can bring unique skills to the workplace.
Astronomers see source of gravitational waves for 1st time
A never-before-seen explosion from the merger of two dense astral bodies known as neutron stars has been viewed with telescopes for the first time.
Flaw lets hackers read data over secure Wi-Fi
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security warns of cyber risks associated with a widely used system for securing Wi-Fi communications after Belgian researchers discovered a flaw that could allow hackers to read information thought to be encrypted, or infect websites with malware.
more »

Money »

Bombardier to partner with Airbus on CSeries program
Bombardier Inc. has announced it has sold a majority stake in its CSeries passenger jet business to European aerospace giant Airbus for no cost.
Disability in demand: People with autism offer employers a broader talent pool
A Danish company with a global mandate to help employers make the most of untapped autistic talent is helping North American firms make concerted efforts to hire employees with autism who can bring unique skills to the workplace.
Analysis Liberals turn to pasta to move past 3 months of fuss and fury over tax fairness video
Perhaps — three months after launching their consultation on "tax fairness" — the Liberals have now landed on a set of policy proposals that can be safely implemented.
more »

Consumer Life »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Sports »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Recap Kucherov keeps scoring streak alive as Lightning top Red Wings video
Nikita Kucherov scored his second goal of the game with 18:13 remaining in the third period, lifting the Tampa Bay Lightning to a 3-2 victory over the Detroit Red Wings on Monday night.
Video Hip Check: Nikita Kucherov lights the lamp, joins history books video
Tampa Bay forward becomes fourth player in 30 years to score a goal in each of his team's first 6 games
Profile Emily Clark's hockey dreams are coming true
When she was still just a hockey-obsessed young girl growing up in Saskatchewan, Emily Clark wrote down a promise — one day, she'd play for Canada. Now she's living the dream.
more »

Diversions »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
more »