Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Software's perpetual beta

by Paul Jay, CBCNews.ca

Well, that didn't take long. Less than a day after IT consultant Capgemini said it would recommend Google Apps Premiere Edition (GAPE) for its business clients, a Microsoft email surfaces offering a top 10 "questions that enterprises should ask when considering the switch to GAPE."

Blogger Mary Jo Foley posted the list after receiving it via an emailed statement, attributable to a “corporate spokesperson," she writes. The list is here.

One criticism in particular stands out, in question No. 2:

"Google has a history of releasing incomplete products, calling them beta software, and issuing updates on a 'known only to Google' schedule – this flies in the face of what enterprises want and need in their technology partners – what is Google doing that indicates they are in lock step with customer needs?"

Say, isn't it patch Tuesday today?

It's true Google loves its perpetual beta testing - isn't Gmail still a beta? - but in some ways, this may be a more honest approach.

Opendemocracy.net's Becky Hodge has a great piece in the New Statesman on this very thing. As she writes:

"Perpetual beta" has thus emerged as a state of mind. As the Google philosophy supposedly goes, why tell your customers a product is finished when they might very well tell you how it could work better? Perpetual beta, as well as being a convenient apology for bugs and glitches (the BBC has recently justified its exclusion of Mac and Linux users from its on-demand TV service the iPlayer by claiming that "it's in beta"), invites your users to become co-developers.

At least with software, such co-operative sharing can be possible. Consider the plight of consumers buying the latest hardware. As my colleague Peter Nowak writes, "gadgets that cost hundreds of dollars are seemingly obsolete almost by the time they come out of the box."

His feature on instant obsolescence is here. It's good reading. Now if you'll excuse me, I have to upgrade my Moveable Type.

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

This discussion is now Open. Submit your Comment.

Comments

Monkey

Winnipeg

I for one enjoy using non-stop betas, I like giving ideas to the creators on how to better the product and thus, upon it's final release, it will be more fine tuned...

I just can't stand having to reboot my computer every five minutes due to the updates though.

Although I don't mind doing that for my graphics drivers, muahaha more POWER!

Posted September 11, 2007 05:10 PM

Charles Witt

There is undoubtedly room for Google perpetual innovation on the computers of many end users and enterprises. Some will hold back. For example, my wife tried GMail and still prefers Yahoo Mail. Yet she still uses Google Documents and Google Chat and Google Search. Enterprises that are comfortable with evolving applications... and I believe there are plenty, will adopt Google Apps. Microsoft is spreading Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt to protect their market dominance.

Posted September 12, 2007 10:05 AM

mt

Ottawa

I'm not sure that the 'Beta' tag really means very much anymore. How many companies release software now without a 'user feedback' or 'problem reporting system' in place? It's all a part of the dynamically updating nature of network connected software. The only difference between Google and Microsoft is that Google is honest enough to admit that their software isn't perfect. Besides, I like the feeling of knowing that the software I am using is still be worked on by the original engineers - that they haven't stopped trying to improve it.

Posted September 12, 2007 10:48 AM

Chris

A great deal of software released these days is actually 'unfinished'. That is, there are always known bugs still to be resolved when the product goes out the door. These bugs can't all be fixed, as by the time this happens, the product wouldn't be useful or a competitor would already have a product on the market. You can thank the rapid pace of technological advancement for this problem.

So the real questions are: 1) how serious is the impact of these known bugs on the user experience, and 2) how does this affect the bottom-line?

If there are only marginal losses to the bottom-line, release! Otherwise, fix some of the 'show-stopper' bugs and then release.

In the end, it all comes down to how much inconvenience we the consumer will bear. My personal recommendation - don't buy software until after its first major patch!

Posted September 12, 2007 01:00 PM

Paul B.

Toronto

Google Mail has only been in beta since its inception. Now since you don't need an invitation anymore, they should get rid of that designation.

Makes Google look kind of incompetent.

Posted September 13, 2007 12:09 AM

Tim

Follow my lead: NEVER UPGRADE. You almost NEVER need to. If your business's needs evolve so (insanely?) fast that you actually can't use the current stuff past the next version increment, you need to stop using computers, or FIX that (insane!) business model. "Out of date" software less than a decade old is a problem only for companies that have made a terrible wrong turn sometime since the 1983 dawn of the MSFT-PC platform.

Upgrades introduce Costs, Delays, *BUGS* and Learning curves for little or no benefit, just a lot of pain and operational inefficiency.

Posted September 13, 2007 07:07 PM

Garet

Winnipeg

Many times upgrades are imperitive or beneficial. For example, tax programs take into account the latest changes in tax laws, so upgrading is a good idea.

Posted September 14, 2007 12:06 PM

Monkey

Winnipeg

Seeing as the idea of an upgrade or patch is to fix something, I don't think it would be called inefficient to have them.

Upgrades are there to better a system, as the name suggests, and there are never costs to upgrades or patches since you have already bought the initial product.

The only time you would have to pay any price whatsoever would be if you are switching to an entirely different system. i.e. Windows XP to Vista.

I for one need updates and upgrades because they keep my systems running properly on up-to-date coding and programming.

Businesses strive on technology, do you, Tim, suggest that businesses go back to pencil and paper? I'm sure they would go bankrupt before the end of the quarter.

Posted September 14, 2007 12:30 PM

Steve Smith

Toronto

Microsoft is the last company that should talk about other software being unready - Hello Windows 95???

Posted September 14, 2007 08:16 PM

Monkey

Winnipeg

Lets not forget Windows M.E. too Steve.

Posted September 17, 2007 12:10 PM

Hippo

Calgary

Or Win 98, or Win XP before SP2, or VIsta so far......

Posted September 19, 2007 01:19 AM

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

Post a Comment

Disclaimer:

Note: By submitting your comments you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that due to the volume of e-mails we receive, not all comments will be published, and those that are published will not be edited. But all will be carefully read, considered and appreciated.

Note: Due to volume there will be a delay before your comment is processed. Your comment will go through even if you leave this page immediately afterwards.

Privacy Policy | Submissions Policy

Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

World »

California warehouse fire kills at least 24, search for victims could last days video
The death toll has risen to 24 in a fire that ripped through a late-night dance party in a converted warehouse in Oakland, Calif., and officials say they expect that number to climb as the search continues.
CBC IN CUBA 'I never stayed to see if they were dead': Natalia Bolivar, 82, unsentimental about role in Cuban Revolution video
At 82 and with an upper-class pedigree, Natalia Bolivar doesn't seem like the typical Cuban revolutionary. That is, until she matter-of-factly begins to recount how she stormed a Havana police station wielding a machine gun, smuggled arms to opposition groups and had all her ribs broken during a police interrogation.
More snow expected in Hawaii as winter hits the Big Island
More snow is expected to fall on Hawaii mountaintops as a storm warning goes into effect through Monday morning.
more »

Canada »

Britain to get 1st major exhibition of Canada's Franklin artifacts
Upward of 22 unique artifacts from HMS Erebus, the sunken Arctic ship from Sir John Franklin's 19th-century expedition, will be on display in Greenwich, England, next year even as their ownership remains in dispute in Canada.
'Lives are on the line' as changes needed for Nutrition North, argues researcher
As the Federal government begins reviewing the results of its Nutrition North community tour, Tracey Galloway says her independent five-year program review shows the program doesn't work.
MMIW commission won't hear testimony from families until spring 2017
Three months after the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women officially began, advocates worry that families have been "left in the dark" about when they might be expected to testify and are feeling disengaged from the process that is supposed to give them a voice.
more »

Politics »

Analysis What we're talking about, and not talking about, when we talk about 'elites' audio
Pity the poor elite, so dismissed and scorned these days by the righteous politician. In 2016, they're an easy target for blame and a handy tool of distraction.
Britain to get 1st major exhibition of Canada's Franklin artifacts
Upward of 22 unique artifacts from HMS Erebus, the sunken Arctic ship from Sir John Franklin's 19th-century expedition, will be on display in Greenwich, England, next year even as their ownership remains in dispute in Canada.
MMIW commission won't hear testimony from families until spring 2017
Three months after the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women officially began, advocates worry that families have been "left in the dark" about when they might be expected to testify and are feeling disengaged from the process that is supposed to give them a voice.
more »

Health »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Arts & Entertainment»

Trevor Noah defends controversial Tomi Lahren interview video
Daily Show host Trevor Noah sits down with The National's Wendy Mesley to discuss U.S. race relations, his childhood under apartheid in South Africa and his controversial interview with right-wing pundit Tomi Lahren.
Video Programmed to thrill: sci-fi hit Westworld's finale 'satisfying,' promises star Jimmi Simpson video
For Westworld fans trading wild theories about where the headline-grabbing HBO series is headed, Jimmi Simpson has been in your shoes. 'I've seen all of them and they're amazing.' The actor talks show controversy, bonding with co-star Evan Rachel Wood and what's in store for the sci-fi hit.
Photos If I Ran the Zoo sculptures reveal the Dr. Seuss you never knew
New exhibition at Toronto's Liss Gallery presents 17 of Dr. Seuss's little-known sculptures together for the first time.
more »

Technology & Science »

Blog A planet's worth of human-made things has been weighed
The collected weight of everything human beings have made — from buildings to ballpoint pens — is staggering.
Killer whales eating their way further into Manitoba
The food chain in Hudson Bay is drastically changing as killer whales take advantage of less sea ice and eat their way into Manitoba, a researcher in Arctic mammal populations says.
Scientists gathering in Winnipeg to focus on 'complex' changing Arctic climate
The largest single gathering of scientists focused on the rapidly changing Arctic gets underway in Winnipeg on Monday.
more »

Money »

Analysis Beyond the hippie stereotype: A closer look at the opposition to Trans Mountain video
The roots of the opposition to Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline expansion run deep.
MARKETPLACE Using Air Miles for overseas flights? It may not be a great deal
Millions of Canadians collect Air Miles reward points on everything from groceries to gas, with many saving their miles for travel. CBC’s Marketplace looked into whether using Air Miles to score flights is always a good deal.
Air Miles caves and botched broccoli: The Marketplace consumer cheat sheet
If you've been too busy this week to keep up with health and consumer news, CBC's Marketplace is here to help.
more »

Consumer Life »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Sports »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Live World Cup alpine skiing: Women's super-G at Lake Louise video
Watch live as the best skiers in the world compete in the the second of this week's women's downhill races from Alberta's Lake Louise.
Kaillie Humphries golden in season-opening World Cup video
Canadian bobsleigh star Kaillie Humphries added another gold medal to her trophy case Saturday, finishing first in the season-opening World Cup on the track she won her first Olympic gold six years ago.
Player's Own Voice Humphries: 'I'm proud of my body'
Canadian star Kaillie Humphries will be the first to tell you her body isn’t shaped in a conventional way. But her strong and tattoo-filled frame has made her a two-time Olympic champion and bobsleigh icon.
more »

Diversions »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
more »