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Going hands-free: Hitachi's brain-machine interface

by Ian Johnson, CBC news online

If you're one of those people who HAS to have the latest and greatest computer gadget, Hitachi has just the thing: A portable brain-machine interface. That is, as long as you've got roughly $840,000 U.S. burning a hole in your pocket.

A brain-machine interface basically senses activity in your brain and converts it into signals to control machinery or electronic devices.

Hitachi showed off an early prototype in November 2006 that allowed people to turn a power switch on and off with a thought - pretty cool, but the headset looked like something out of a 1960s sci-fi drama. The version unveiled Tuesday represents an enormous leap forward, at least in the aesthetics department - it looks like something from a 1980s sci-fi drama (see photo).

Photo Credit Getty Images.jpg(Photo: Getty Images)


Details from Tuesday's demonstration at the company's headquarters in Japan were sketchy, and the company didn't say whether the capabilities had been expanded from the version shown to the public in November last year. Hitachi did say the system is easy to use and that it had been built using parts from models designed for medical applications. It has eight pairs of lasers and optical sensors in a special headband that measures prefrontal cortex activity in the brain.

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Gizella Szabo

WOW, way to go. This technology can prove how thoughts can effect environment. Very interesting.

Posted May 23, 2007 09:27 AM

Steve St-Laurent

Only $840,000 to throw a switch? Seems we're getting a little top-heavy in our technological advances, and all for the benefit of a tiny minority. How many people would that feed, house and educate. What were they thinking? Wait, it would take billions to find out. Thanks a lot, big brain!

Posted May 24, 2007 03:17 PM

Mike

Ottawa

Today they need a headband to read our thoughts ... anyone else wonder how long it will take before these lasers and optical sensors will work at a distance?

Posted May 25, 2007 09:51 AM

Mr. NeoCan

Halifax

Awesome, bring it on!

I can only wonder how the quality of life for people with mobility disabilies will improve when the cost of these devices drops to affordable ranges.

Computers used to cost $800K at one point too. In 20-40 years this tech. will be common place.

Posted May 25, 2007 04:04 PM

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