Show News April 20, 2011
Update: Two Photojournalists Killed In Libya

Update: It's been confirmed that Chris Hondros has also died from his wounds.

Hondros had covered most of the world's war zones; including Afghanistan, Iraq, Kashmir, Kosovo, and Sierra Leone to name a few. His photos won numerous awards, not just for their striking quality, but their uncanny ability to almost singlehandedly contextualize a story.

Here are some moving tributes to Hetherington and Hondros...

http://www.vanityfair.com/magazine/2011/04/sebastian-junger-remembers-tim-hetherington-201104
http://www.hrw.org/en/news/2011/04/20/tribute-tim-hetherington

http://www.cpj.org/blog/2011/04/a-tribute-to-chris-hondros-who-ventured-far-with-h.php
http://www.life.com/gallery/59531/chris-hondros-photographer-at-war#index/0

April 20, 2011 3:30 p.m. ET

Sad news from the war zone in Libya. Acclaimed photojournalist Tim Hetherington was killed covering the fighting in Misrata today.

He, along with fellow photojournalists Chris Hondros, Guy Martin and Michael Christopher Brown, was embedded with rebel fighters as they battled Gadhafi's forces.

Hondros, Martin and Brown were all wounded in the fighting. Hondros is said to be in extremely critical condition, with severe brain injuries. Martin is in grave condition as well, with shrapnel wounds and was reportedly undergoing surgery. Brown was also wounded by shrapnel but his life is not in danger.

In addition to photojournalism, Hetherington was also a filmmaker. He earned an Oscar nomination along with Sebastian Junger for Restrepo, and for a time he was an investigator for the UN Security Council.

By all accounts the situation for civilians in Misrata is getting more dangerous and unpredictable by the day. There are reports of heavy weapons being used against non-combatants by Gadhafi's forces. Medical facilities have reportedly been targeted by mortar and sniper fire. The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights is warning Moammar Gadhafi that his forces may be committing war crimes. The civilian body count is now in the hundreds.

Here are some of the latest eye-opening photos taken by Chris Hondros during his work in Libya.

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