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Q & A: 10 Questions With The Director Of ‘Midnight’s Children’ Deepa Mehta
October 30, 2012
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Deepa Mehta - one of Canada's most respected and critically acclaimed filmmakers - is in the red chair tonight.

Her latest film, 'Midnight's Children,' is based on the Booker Prize winning novel by Salman Rushdie.

It was one of the most buzzed about films at this year's Toronto International Film Festival, but getting it made was quite a challenge.

While on set in Sri Lanka, production was shut down for a few days after a complaint from Iran - who has a fatwa against Rushdie. But as she always does, Mehta persevered and finished shooting.

'Midnight's Children' opens November 2 in Toronto and Vancouver; November 9 in the rest of the country.

As a warm-up for tonight's show, we asked Deepa Mehta to take The Strombo Q & A.

1. What are three things that make you really happy?

DM: My daughter, my farm in the summertime, a clean house.

2. A movie (other than your own) or movie scene that always makes you cry?

DM: Believe it or not, I have not cried in a movie. Yet.

3. What do you hope people take away from your new film 'Midnight's Children'?

DM: As geographic and national boundaries blur, we increasingly find that we have families that are not of the same bloodline. Families that are created and not made. How does one create a home in themselves, in a family or a country? These are things I want to audience to think about.

4. Name three people (alive or dead) that you'd like to have dinner with.

DM: Paul Auster, Ryszard Kapuscinski and Shah Rukh Khan. Although, I'd prefer a park bench as dinner is too distracting.

5. What's something that really scares you?

DM: Hesitancy. Do, or do not do. The middle place is dangerous.

6. Tell us about someone who helped make you who you are today.

DM: My father comes to mind immediately. He was a truly wonderful man. A gentleman. A great love of movies and a healthy sense of humour are certainly things he embodied that define me today. While he is not physically here, Midnight's Children is very much a film about fathers. I hope he'd be proud of it. I think he would.

7. What does independence mean to you?

DM: The ability to create and express in non-judgment. The power to vote. The ability to say 'yes' or 'no' and each be equally accepted. A driver's license.

8. What are three things you love about your hometown in India?

DM: I miss the food, monsoons and Humayuns Tomb in Delhi.

9. Tell us about one of your most prized possessions?

DM: Sooner than later I lose stuff, so nothing really. Okay, okay my Blackberry if push comes to shove.

10. What piece of advice would you give for someone to live a good life?

DM: Wear comfortable shoes if you want to direct films.

A few footnotes for you.

Paul Auster is an award-winning, best-selling author of 'Sunset Park', 'Invisible', 'Man in the Dark', 'The Book of Illusions', 'The Brooklyn Follies', and 'The New York Trilogy'.

Ryszard Kapuscinski was a Polish journalist, who spent much of his career covering Africa including 27 revolutions and coups around the continent. His books were translated into 30 languages. He won literary prizes in Germany, France, Canada, Italy, the US, and was made journalist of the century in Poland.

Shah Rukh Khan is an Indian film actor and Bollywood star. He has been in more than 70 Hindi films and has won the most Best Actor Filmfare Awards of any Bollywood star. In 2011, the L.A. Times called him the "world's biggest movie star", with a fan following said to be in the billions.

The Humayuns Tomb was built in 1570. It was the first garden-tomb on the Indian subcontinent. It inspired several major architectural innovations, culminating in the building of the Taj Mahal. In 1993, the tomb was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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