Politics
Internet Is Buzzing About Benjamin Netanyahu’s Cartoon-Like Bomb; Plus The Top 5 Most Bizarre Speech
September 28, 2012
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Not sure if you caught any of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech at the UN General Assembly.

In it, Netanyahu urged the international community (namely the U.S.) to give Iran an ultimatum over its nuclear program.

Netanyahu said Iran will be on the brink of a nuclear weapon in less than a year, and won't back down unless it's faced with a clear red line.

And just so the world was clear, Netanyahu pulled out a chart and literally drew a red line just below a label reading "final stage" to a bomb - which certainly illustrated his point.

Although, we couldn't help but wonder - what's with the drawing of a bomb with a fuse coming out of it?

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Obviously, it was meant to reinforce the very real threat to Israel (and perhaps the world) if Iran develops a nuclear weapon.

But it also seemed strikingly similar to one of those ACME products in the Wile E. Coyote/Roadrunner cartoon. A reference that was not lost on the internet community.


Check out some of the photos we found on the web today, poking fun at Netanyahu.

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As much fun as people are having with Netanyahu's cartoon bomb, it's nothing compared to the stuff other leaders have done at the UN.

Namely Iran's Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who this week referred to Israel as a "fake regime", the "uncivilized Zionists" and said Israelis in the Middle East "have no roots there in history".

Recently, he's also characterized Israel as an "insult to humanity" and "a cancerous tumour" and called again for its "disappearance".

With comments like that, no wonder Israel is concerned about Iran developing a nuclear bomb.

It's also why we didn't include Ahmadinejad in the list below; because his comments aren't bizarre - they're hateful and offensive.

But enough about politics. To lighten things up here are:

The Top 5 Most Bizarre Speeches Ever Delivered At The United Nations

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# 5 - In 1957, during a debate over Kashmir, the UN envoy from Indian Krishna Menon decided to run an extreme marathon, politically speaking. As part of a filibuster, Menon set the record for the longest speech in the history of the UN Security Council - more than eight hours! Although, it did stretch over two days.

At one point, Menon reportedly collapsed from exhaustion and had to be taken to hospital. But like a trooper, he came back for another hour, while a doctor kept an eye on his blood pressure. It was a such an epic argument for India's sovereignty in Kashmir, that the Indian media called Menon 'The Hero of Kashmir.'

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# 4 - One of the most iconic moments of the Cold War. In 1960, as Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev was speaking, a delegate from the Philippines started ranting against the Soviet empire. Khrushchev stopped a speech and called for that "toady of American imperialism" to be called to order.

Then, to drive home his point, Khrushchev took off his shoe and started banging it on the table. It could have been worse though, especially when you consider Khrushchev once gave an address to western ambassadors, that became known as the "We Will Bury You" speech.

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# 3 - 1960 was a big year at the UN. It was also the year Cuban President Fidel Castro made his first speech to the General Assembly. And what a debut. Castro went on for four-and-a-half hours, ripping American imperialism, and insulting the two U.S. Presidential candidates at the time - Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy. Of JFK, Castro said ''Were Kennedy not a millionaire, illiterate, and ignorant, then he would obviously understand that you cannot revolt against the peasants.''

Castro also refused to stay at an upscale hotel in New York, and took a room at a run-down in Harlem where he met with journalists, Khrushchev and even Malcolm X. Not only that, but he reportedly kept live chickens in his room. By the way, as long as his UN speech was, Castro's all-time record was in 1986 at the Communist Party Congress in Cuba - seven hours and ten minutes.

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# 2 - One thing about Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez, you can always count on a little political theatre. And regardless of what you think about his politics, it's tough not to find it entertaining. Case in point - in 2006 during a speech the UN General Assembly, Chavez compared U.S. President George W. Bush to Satan with this memorable line "The devil came here yesterday, and it smells of sulfur still."

During his speeches, Chavez would also plug books by prominent left-wing authors - even holding up a book by American professor Noam Chomsky. Once Barack Obama became President, Chavez told the General Assembly it "no longer smells like sulfur."

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# 1 - In 2009, after 40 years in power, Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi addressed the UN General Assembly for the first time. Gaddafi took the podium after Barack Obama, and was scheduled to speak for 15 minutes. But hey, after 40 years, the man had a lot to get off his chest. So, for 96 long minutes, Gaddafi droned on about everything under the sun.

Among the highlights - he said swine flu was man-made, accusing the U.S. of developing it in a lab to use as a military weapon; he questioned the official story behind JFK's assassination; and he said the UN Security Council "should be called a terror council."

He also talked about Somali pirates, complained about the time difference between Tripoli and New York, and promoted his website 'Gaddafi Speaks.'

As well, Gaddafi ripped up a copy of the UN charter and tossed it on the floor (saying it has left smaller countries with no power). He went through two different interpreters - at one point checking that one of them was translating what he said properly.

At one point, a Libyan delegate handed him a note which he read and ignored. Plus, he got his notes so mixed up, he lost his place several times.

Watch Gaddafi in action.

To top it off, for his stay in New York, Gaddafi wanted to set up a Bedouin tent in Central Park but the city wouldn't let him. So, he reportedly ended up camping out on a piece of property owned by Donald Trump.

Trump denies that. You can check out Trump's side of the story here.

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