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Canada Reads: This Year’s Winner Is Lisa Moore For Her Book ‘February’, Representing Atlantic Canada
February 14, 2013
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The winner of this year's CBC Canada Reads competition was announced today - Lisa Moore for her book February.

Moore's novel beat out Two Solitudes by Hugh MacLellan, in the final vote by three Canada Reads panelists.

February is about a woman who struggles to come to terms with the death of her husband in the Ocean Ranger disaster.

The Ocean Ranger oil rig sank off Newfoundland 31 years ago tomorrow. It went down after being hit by a blizzard, killing 84 people.

canada-reads-this-year's-winner-is-lisa-moore-for-her-book-february-representing-atlantic-canada-feature2.jpg "I'm humbled," said Moore, speaking from St. John's. "I have to say I wasn't expecting this at all."

She commended the panel for their debate over the four days.

"All of you have been respectful and smart and passionate and, most importantly to me as a writer, honest. People have been talking about the books exactly the way they feel about them, and that is the most a person could ask for."

This year's debate - entitled Canada Reads: Turf Wars - saw books from the different regions of Canada competing against each other.

Along with February, which represented Atlantic Canada and Two Solitudes, which represented Quebec, the list included...

The Age of Hope by David Bergen, representing the Prairies & the North.

Away by Jane Urquhart, representing Ontario.

Indian Horse, by Richard Wagamese, representing B.C. & the Yukon.

The four-day debate was hosted by Jian Ghomeshi. He'll interview Lisa Moore tomorrow on Q on CBC Radio.

Moore's book was defended by Newfoundland and Labrador comedian Trent McClellan.

He argued that readers would relate to the main character Helen's grief and her financial struggles as a single mom.

McClellan, by the way, was on our Three Things panel this past Tuesday. You can watch that here.

And Jay Baruchel, who defended Two Solitudes, was in the red chair last night. You can watch that interview here.

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