Radio

Sundays 8pm to 11pm on Radio 2

New Episodes at CBC Music

New Episodes at CBC Music

Need more Strombo Show? Head over to our page on CBC Music for new episodes, playlists and video extras.

CBC Music Past Shows

 

 

Social Issues
Over 1,000 Journalists Have Been Killed Since The Committee To Protect Journalists Started Keeping T
August 16, 2013
submit to reddit

1000-journalists-mick-deane.jpg
Mick Deane, a camera operator who was killed in Cairo, in a handout photo provided by Sky News (Photo: AP)

Mick Deane, a camera operator with Sky News, was killed in Cairo, Egypt on Wednesday, August 14, making him the 1,000th journalist killed in the line of duty since 1992, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ).

Deane was shot while covering a raid by Egyptian security forces on a protest camp in Cairo.

John Ryley, the head of Sky News, said Deane's co-workers were "shocked and saddened by Mick's death," and that "the loss of a much-loved colleague will be deeply felt."

Two other journalists were also reported killed in Egypt this week. CBC News reports that Habiba Ahmed Abd Elaziz, who worked for United Arab Emirates publication XPRESS, was shot in Cairo. The Gulf News, a state-backed newspaper which is a sister publication to XPRESS, reported her death.

Egyptian journalist Ahmed Abdel Gawad, who wrote for the state-run newspaper Al Akhbar, was also killed according to the Egyptian Press Syndicate.

According to The Atlantic Wire, Deane's death was unusual from a statistical standpoint. The circumstances of his death are known, unlike those surrounding the deaths of 400 journalists on the CPJ list.

And the circumstances of Deane's death are known, unlike 400 of the journalists on the list.

Here are a few insights based on CPJ research about how the 1,000 journalists on the list died.

According to CPJ research, 88 per cent of those who killed journalists did so with complete impunity:

1000-journalists-impunity.jpg

This is what those 1,000 deaths look like when broken down by month, in a chart created by the Atlantic:

1000-journalists-by-month.jpg

The spike in November, 2009 is due to the Maguindanao massacre, a bombing that took place in the Philippines. CPJ has called it the single deadliest event for journalists in history - at least 32 journalists were killed.

The majority of journalists killed in the line of duty are local - 12 per cent are foreign.

1000-journalists-local-foreign.jpg

Two journalists on the list were killed in Canada:

Brian Smith, a sportscaster with CJOH-TV in Ottawa, was shot in 1995 by Jeffrey Arenburg, who later turned himself in. Police say he "bore a grudge against the media and wished to harm a media personality."

Tara Singh Hayer, publisher of the Indo-Canadian Times, was shot dead in the garage of his home in Vancouver in 1998. He was an outspoken critic of extremist Sikh violence. No one was charged in the murder, and Robert Hatas wrote in a 2012 opinion piece in The Globe and Mail that the unsolved killing "stains Canada's reputation for press freedom."

Via The Atlantic Wire

Related:

'Toast To Freedom': It's World Press Freedom Day

DYING TO TELL THEIR STORIES: The International Day to End Impunity

New Bill Being Considered In Iran Could Threaten Women's Right To Travel And Obtain A Passport

Comments

Starting soon: To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, for all new accounts, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted for existing community members in June.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Submission Policy

Note: The CBC does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that comments are moderated and published according to our submission guidelines.