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IMAGES OF THE DAY: Great Canadian Editorial Cartoons
June 22, 2012
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The editorial cartoon is a tough form: in a single image, it has to clearly establish the issue, make a commentary on the subject, and hopefully generate a good laugh. In his forthcoming book 'Caricature - Cartoon Canada', cartoonist Terry Mosher (or Aislin, as he's known in the Montreal Gazette), shows off some of the most successful examples of editorial cartooning in Canada with a collection of his favourites.

Terry had a lot of material to choose from: editorial cartooning in Canada goes back to the 19th century. But it really came into its own in the 1940s and '50s, when Robert LaPalme in Le Devoir and Duncan MacPherson in the Toronto Star started satirizing Duplessis and Diefenbaker respectively. Terry's book includes cartoons from across the country in both official languages.

The book launches June 29 as part of'Cartooning Calamities' exhibition, a collection of editorial cartoons about disasters in Canada. The book launch also coincides with the convention of the Association of Canadian Editorial Cartoonists, Thursday, June 28 - Sunday, July 1. Check out a few pages from the book below:

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