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Art Inspired By Google Maps And Persian Rugs
April 11, 2013
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David_Thomas_Smith_art.jpg
Images via the Copper House Gallery

Google Maps don't just help you find your way, they can inspire art.

David Thomas Smith is an Irish artist who uses digital Google Map aerial views and reconstructs them to create vibrant images.

'Anthropocene' is his latest exhibition, a term coined by a Dutch chemist Paul Crutzen to describe our geologic epoch - specifically humankind's impact on the planet.

If his work seems familiar, David Thomas Smith patterns his art on Persian rug motifs and draws upon how Afghan weavers use rugs to document day to day life.

He does this in a decidedly modern way: by using screen grabs of thousands upon thousands of thumbnail images and painstakingly reconfiguring them using Photoshop.

Smith's work has been featured in 'Esquire' as well as the journals 'Lens Culture' and 'Conscientious' and is coming to Dublin's Copper House Gallery.

The images above from left to right, are the Burj Dubai Tower in the United Arab Emirates, the Delta Coal Port in Vancouver and the Three Mile Island Generating Station in Middletown, Pennsylvania.

Below, you'll find California's famous tech hub, Silicon Valley.

Silicon Valley.jpg

Similar to Canadian Edward Burtynsky, Smith imposes order on grand scale industrial projects, though from a greater distance and with a different medium.

They've both examined The Three Gorges hydroelectric dam that spans the Yangtze River in China and both explore nature transformed through industry.

'Anthropocene' looks at landscapes associated with consumer culture in all its forms - from extracting minerals out of the earth to structures that rise to the sky.

For more on David Thomas Smith, check out the Copper House Gallery site.

via businessinsider.com

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