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Adam van Koeverden celebrates his semifinal heat win in the K1 1,000 on Friday morning in Dartmouth, N.S. ((Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press))

Canadians Adam Van Koeverden and Mark Oldershaw will vie for medals after advancing to two finals each on Friday at the 2009 Canoe Sprint World Championships in Dartmouth, N.S.

The pair, who practise out of Oakville's Burloak Canoe Club, were among a number of Canadians who advanced to the finals on Friday.

CBC Sports will air the world championships on Saturday, Aug. 15, at 1 p.m. ET and on Monday, Aug. 17, at 12:30 a.m. Events will be streamed live on CBCSports.ca Saturday through Monday.

Van Koeverden, of Oakville, Ont., finished in a time of 3:29.287 in the semifinal of the K1 1,000 metres on Friday morning.

"It felt really good," he told CBC Sports. "Inevitably I can have a much better last 200 metres [in the final]."

The 27-year-old van Koeverden, who won silver in Beijing in the men's 1,000 metres, broke his right ankle about seven weeks ago while on a whitewater rafting trip.

Beijing gold winner Ken Wallace of Australia also advanced Friday morning, as did Max Hoff of Germany, another strong medal contender.

Van Koeverden then went on to qualify for the 500, finishing second in his semifinal behind Germany's Ronald Rauhe.

Oldershaw of Burlington, Ont., won both his 500 and 1,000 C1 semifinals on Friday.  

Running on energy

Oldershaw told CBC Sports he felt like he still had energy left in the tank after taking his C1 1,000 semifinal in a time of 4:01.824.

"Being here in Dartmouth has been amazing," said Oldershaw. "Even in the heats and today in the semi, hearing the crowd just brought me home so hard. I can't wait for the finals."

He proved it by coming back a few hours later to take his 500 heat in 2:00.404.

Andrew Russell of Dartmouth and Gabriel Beauchesne-Sevigny of Trois-Rivières, Que., advanced to the C2 finals in both the 500 and 1,000.

Russell and Beauchesne-Sevigny finished second in their 1,000 semifinal behind Jose Bulnes and Serguey Torres, and third later in the day in the 500.

"The 500 was really tough, we knew it was going to be an absolute dogfight," said Russell. "We just had to make sure no one was tougher than us in the last 200."

"We really fed off the energy of the crowd," added Beauchesne-Sevigny.

Russell's younger brother, Benjamin, was part of the C4 squad that won its semifinal in the 1,000 on Friday, narrowly beating Russia in 3:24.763. The foursome also includes Richard Dalton of Halifax, Thomas Hall of Pointe-Claire, Que., and Ottawa's Ian Mortimer.

Richard Dober Jr. of Trois-Rivières and Steven Jorens of Richmond Hill, Ont., were third in their K2 1,000 semi behind Norway and Cuba, but did enough to qualify for the final.

Dober Jr. and Andrew Willows of Gananoque, Ont., were fourth in the K2 500 semi, landing them in the B final.

Karen Furneaux of nearby Waverly is also headed to the B final after clocking 2:01.242 in the women's K1 500 semifinal.

Canada's K4 1,000 team of Rhys Hill, Chris Pellini, Argus Mortimer and Brady Reardon finished in a time of 3:01.592, which was not good enough to reach the final.

Tamyln Bohm of Toronto also bowed out in the semis. Bohm finished in 4:14.480 in the women's K1 1,000.