The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency says it has been in contact with Lance Armstrong and is giving him more time to decide if he wants to co-operate with its investigators and tell more about what he knows of doping in cycling.

USADA investigated the cyclist's performance-enhancing drug use and banned him for life from sports. It has given him an extra two weeks to work out an interview with investigators under oath.

USADA chief executive Travis Tygart says in a statement his group has been "in communication" with Armstrong and his representatives and "we understand that he does want to be part of the solution and assist in the effort to clean up the sport of cycling."

The agency says Armstrong must co-operate with its cleanup effort if his ban is to be reduced.

Sued for $12 million

A Dallas promotions company is suing Armstrong to repay $12 million in bonuses it paid him for winning the Tour de France.

Armstrong admitted he used performance-enhancing drugs and has been stripped of those victories.

SCA Promotions filed its lawsuit Thursday in Dallas district court. The company tried to withhold the money in 2005 because of doping allegations but ultimately settled with Armstrong in arbitration.

Now SCA says Armstrong's admission proves a conspiracy to cheat and defraud the company into paying him millions.

The lawsuit also targets Armstrong agent Bill Stapleton as a defendant.

Armstrong's attorney did not immediately return a message.