Eugenie Bouchard progressed further than she ever has at a Grand Slam in her young career, but she was left lamenting missed chances that could have prolonged her run into the depleted field at Wimbledon.

Bouchard lost her bid for a spot in the fourth round at Wimbledon on Friday as the Montreal teenager lost to Spain's Carla Suarez Navarro 7-5, 6-2.

"This was an opportunity that I had that I lost," Bouchard said. "I felt generally the whole match I had a few loose shots, loose errors, that I normally don't make that I was making."

Canadian doubles results

Two Canadian men's doubles teams advanced, with veteran Daniel Nestor and Swedish partner Robert Lindstedt reaching the third round.

The sixth-seeded Nestor and Lindstedt defeated Argentines Eduardo Schwank and Horacio Zeballos 6-1, 7-5, 6-3 and will next face the winner from a match between ninth-seeded Britons Colin Fleming and Jonathan Marray and Czech Frantisek Cermak and Slovak Michael Mertinak.

There was also first-round success for Canadians Jesse Levine and Vasek Pospisil as that unseeded combination defeated Lukas Dlouhy of the Czech Republic and American Rajeev Ram, 6-2, 6-4, 6-1.

Levine and Pospisil will next take on American Nicolas Monroe and German Simon Stadler.

Despite the loss, it was a career-best grand slam showing for the 66th-ranked Bouchard. Her previous best was a berth in the second round of the French Open earlier this year.

The 2012 junior champion at the All England club fought hard from 4-1 down in both sets but was unable to close the gap against the experienced Spaniard. The first set went well over an hour, the second was done in an additional 29 minutes.

"She returned really well, I knew that going in," Bouchard said. "My serve wasn't as good as previous matches."

Bouchard limited her winning chances with 21 unforced errors in the opening set. She saved two set points in the ninth game, forced her opponent to four break points in the 11th and then dropped her own serve in the 12th as Suarez Navarro fired a backhand winner down the line.

Bouchard failed to regroup in the second set as the pair traded early breaks before the Spaniard ran off into the lead.

Bouchard saved two match points in the final game before sending a forehand out to end it with 24 winners and 32 unforced errors.

"For sure it went differently than I hoped," Bouchard said. "She was very consistent, and more aggressive than me. I should have done more to try to control the points — instead she did.

"I'll take lots of experience out of this whole week and try to learn from all the mistakes and take the good and the bad and just keep working hard."

Murray aiming at history

Olympic champion Andy Murray continued his perfect start to Wimbledon with a straight-sets victory over Tommy Robredo to reach the fourth round.

Playing under the retractable roof on Centre Court because of persistent rain, Murray was in control throughout and advanced with a clinical 6-2, 6-4, 7-5 win.

The second-seeded Murray, who missed the French Open because of a back injury, has yet to lose a set at the All England Club this year. He warmed up for Wimbledon by winning at Queen's Club.

Murray is again bidding to become the first Briton to win Wimbledon since Fred Perry in 1936.

The player who stunned Roger Federer in one of Wimbledon's greatest upsets didn't stick around very long.

Two days after eliminating the seven-time champion on Centre Court, Sergiy Stakhovsky fell to Jurgen Melzer in four sets Friday in the third round at the All England Club.

The 116th-ranked Ukrainian couldn't replicate the serve-and-volley magic that stifled Federer, losing 6-2, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3 to the left-handed Austrian. While Federer struggled with Stakhovsky's serve, Melzer broke him six times.

Advancing to the third round were fourth-seeded David Ferrer and No. 13 Tommy Haas. No. 15 Nicolas Almagro was knocked out by Poland's Jerzy Janowicz in a third-round match.

Among the women, No. 7 Angelique Kerber was ousted in three sets in second-round play by Estonia's Kaia Kanepi. Kerber became the sixth player among the top-10 seeded women to go out.

With four of the top 10 men also gone after the second round, it equals the worst performance by the top 10 at any Grand Slam in the 45-year history of the Open era.

Also, Britain's Laura Robson beat 117th-ranked Colombian qualifier Mariana Duque-Marino 6-4, 6-1 under the Centre Court roof to reach Wimbledon's third round for the first time.

Robson, who won the Wimbledon girls' title in 2008, has steadily climbed the rankings and has a good chance of getting into the second week.

Among the early casualties in the men's draw was Grigor Dimitrov, one of the rising stars in tennis. He was eliminated in the second round in a five-set, rain-delayed match that lasted more than four hours over two days.

With girlfriend Maria Sharapova cheering him from the stands on Court 3, the 29th-seeded Bulgarian fell to 55th-ranked Slovenian Grega Zemlja 3-6, 7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-4, 11-9.

With files from The Canadian Press