Padres' Cameron Maybin suspended 25 games for drugs

San Diego Padres outfielder Cameron Maybin has been suspended for 25 games for testing positive for an amphetamine.

Outfielder tested positive for amphetamine

San Diego Padres outfielder Cameron Maybin was suspended for a positive drug test on Wednesday. (Denis Poroy/Getty Images)

San Diego Padres outfielder Cameron Maybin was suspended 25 games by Major League Baseball on Wednesday for testing positive for an amphetamine.

Maybin said in a statement distributed through the Major League Baseball Players Association the failed test was the result of a change in the medication he was using to treat Attention Deficit Disorder.

"I have been undergoing treatment for several years for a medical condition, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), for which I previously had a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE). Unfortunately, in my attempts to switch back to a medicine that had been previously OK'd, I neglected to follow all the rules and as a result I tested positive," Maybin said. "I want to assure everyone that this was a genuine effort to treat my condition and I was not trying in any way to gain an advantage in my baseball career."

Drug agreement

Under the drug agreement between MLB and its players' union, 25 games is the penalty for a second positive amphetamine test. A first positive results only in six unannounced follow-up tests over the next year.

The 27-year-old Maybin was batting .247 with one home run and nine RBIs in 62 games this season.

"I understand that I must accept responsibility for this mistake and I will take my punishment and will not challenge my suspension. I apologize to my family, friends, fans, teammates, and the entire Padres organization. I look forward to returning to the field and contributing to the success of my Club."

MLB permits an exemption for players with attention deficit disorder. The annual report from the drug program's independent administrator, Dr. Jeffrey M. Anderson, said 119 therapeutic use exemptions were granted for ADD drugs in the year ending with the conclusion of the 2013 World Series.

There were seven positive tests for Adderall in that span that resulted in discipline.

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