Kevin-Prince Boateng slams Ghana federation

Ghana's World Cup preparations were a nightmare of arguments over cash, flooded hotel rooms and long-haul flights in economy class, according to their suspended midfielder Kevin-Prince Boateng.

4 key reasons why World Cup ended in disappointment

Ghana's Kevin Prince Boateng sounds off on the country's soccer federation. Boateng and Sulley Muntari were sent home prior to the team's final Group match at the FIFA World Cup in Brazil. (Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters)

Ghana's World Cup preparations were a nightmare of arguments over cash, flooded hotel rooms and long-haul flights in economy class, according to their suspended midfielder Kevin-Prince Boateng.

Ghana, quarter-finalists four years ago, crashed out of the tournament in the group stage with Boateng and teammate Sulley Muntari suspended before their final game.

Speaking to German media, Boateng went through four reasons for the team's demise.

1. Problems from the start

"I would have never thought that a World Cup preparation could be organized that badly, Everything was amateurish," the German-born player told Germany's SportBild magazine.

"The nightmare started on the first day of preparations and lasted until the final day."

Ghana exited the tournament with one point from three games and the country ordered an investigation into the debacle.

Boateng was sanctioned by the Ghanaian football federation for using "vulgar verbal insults" against coach Kwesi Appiah.

"I don't care what they say. I am very relaxed about it because I know I did nothing of the sort," Boateng said.

2. Pay dispute

He said players boycotted training once over unpaid bonuses and accused the federation of failing to spend money from world soccer's governing body FIFA on team preparations.

Ghana president, John Mahama, later stepped in to try to resolve the dispute and around $3 million eventually arrived in Brazil in cash with a convoy of cars bringing the money to the team's headquarters.

Boateng said the cash, however, was the least of their problems.

3. Economy class 'hurts'

"Flying from Miami to Brazil lasted 12 hours. We were squeezed into economy with the legs hurting. It may sound strange for the average citizen but it is demanding for a high-performance athlete," he said.

"Meanwhile, our [federation] president sat in business class with his wife and his two kids."

4. Hotel was 'a dump'

Boateng said that prior to Ghana's opening group game against the United States he had to change rooms in his hotel because it was flooded.

"I don't say hotel, it was a dump. I had to change rooms because my room resembled a private swimming pool with the ceiling dripping."

Boateng, who played for Ghana at the 2010 tournament but then retired, announced last August he was making himself available for selection when Ghana were already comfortably on course for World Cup qualification.

Asked whether his career with Ghana was now over he said he would not play under current conditions, leaving the door open for a future comeback.

"I do not need to retire. It was them who threw me out," the 27-year-old said. "I love the country and the people but under these conditions it is difficult to continue playing.

"I will go on holiday, return in mid-July to (German club) Schalke 04 and then we will see."

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