Carlos Velasco on World Cup final short list despite ref furor

Japan's Yuichi Nishimura and Spain's Carlos Velasco, responsible for two of the most criticised refereeing performances of the World Cup, have been put on the short list for the final, FIFA said on Monday.

Japan's Yuichi Nishimura also on list

Critics say referee Carlos Velasco lost control of the quarter-final match between Colombia and Brazi last Friday. (Robert Cianflone/Getty Images)

Japan's Yuichi Nishimura and Spain's Carlos Velasco, responsible for two of the most criticised refereeing performances of the World Cup, have been put on the short list for the final, FIFA said on Monday.

Soccer's governing body said both officials were among 15 teams of referees and linesman who had been asked to stay on for the semi-finals and final

Nishimura awarded a controversial penalty to Brazil in the tournament's opening game against Croatia with the score at 1-1. Neymar converted and Brazil went on to win 3-1.

Critics said that Velasco lost control of Brazil's quarter-final against Colombia on Friday.

The game was interrupted by 54 fouls but Velasco showed only four yellow cards. Brazil forward Neymar suffered a fractured vertebra after a challenge which went unpunished.

England's Howard Webb, who refereed the previous World Cup final between Spain and Netherlands will also stay on.

Mexico's Marco Antonio Rodriguez has already been picked to referee the first semi-final between Brazil and Germany on Tuesday.

"The [referees'' committee defined the list after careful monitoring of all referees and assistant referees on a daily basis together with the technical staff," said FIFA in a statement.

"In line with how designations have been made throughout the tournament, quality was the main criteria while physical, medical and technical aspects were also taken into consideration."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.