Profile

Arjen Robben: World Cup player profile

You’ll recognize Arjen Robben by the orange blur screaming up and down the touchline during Dutch matches.
Dutch winger Arjen Robben is one of five players returning from the 2010 Netherlands squad that finished second at the World Cup. (Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty)

You’ll recognize Arjen Robben by the orange blur screaming up and down the touchline during Dutch matches.

Why he's so special 

There’s not many things defenders fear more than Robben running at them with the ball. He has a multitude of options to blow by defenders, and most of them involve his incredible pace.

Famous moment 

In 2013, Robben gave Bayern Munich its fifth Champions League title by scoring the match-winning goal in the 89th minute against fellow German club Borussia Dortmund. It was sweet redemption for Robben, who missed a match-winning penalty kick in the dying minutes of their defeat in the 2012 Champions League final against Chelsea.

Born: Jan. 23, 1984
Club: Bayern Munich
Nickname: The Flying Dutchman

He said it 

“When I was young, I was totally focused on me, me, me. When you are in the mid twenties, you become more aware of team tactics and now I guess I am seen as a potential leader. I am totally cool with that. All the players of my age are happy to be mentoring the young lads. It’s important that we do, as we are all the same team.”

What they're saying about him

“The way he does everything, starting with his warm-ups, I find it all fantastic.” -- Dutch coach Louis van Gaal.

Strengths

  • Speed. Speed. More speed. Speed with the ball. Speed without the ball. There may be a theme here.

Weaknesses 

  • Has been susceptible to injury throughout his career. Sometimes is completely invisible on the pitch, especially on defence.

Fun Fact

Robben is fluent in four languages: English, German, Dutch and Spanish.

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