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Robin Williams on sports

As a tribute to beloved comedian and actor Robin Williams, who was found dead Monday of an apparent suicide, here are a few of his brushes with the sports world.

Beloved comedian/actor tackled athletics in standup, movies

Robin Williams, left, a Giants fan, and fellow comedian/actor Billy Crystal, a Yankees supporter, had some fun during a Fox broadcast in 2007. (Greg Trott/Getty Images)

Famed comedian and actor Robin Williams on Monday was found dead of an apparent suicide at his home in the San Francisco Bay Area. He was 63.

As a tribute to the beloved funnyman, who also showed serious chops as a dramatic actor, here are a few of his brushes with the sports world.

(Most of the clips contain some pretty salty language, so viewer discretion is definitely advised.)

Williams's role as a tough but empathetic Boston therapist in the 1997 film Good Will Hunting earned him a Best Supporting Actor Oscar.

In this scene, he tells Matt Damon's title character the story of why he skipped out on Game 6 of the 1975 World Series at Fenway Park — won by the Red Sox on Carlton Fisk's iconic 12th-inning homer — to go "see about a girl":

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Here's Williams goofing with fellow comedian/actor Billy Crystal and tennis star Andre Agassi during a celebrity match in the late 1990s:

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A stand-up comedian since the early 1970s, Williams performed this bit on the Winter Olympics in which (starting at 3:35) he takes on Canadian snowboarder Ross Rebagliati's positive marijuana test and pokes fun at Canada's hockey dominance:

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Here's Williams on golf:

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And his off-colour take on the differences between soccer, football and hockey:

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