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IOC to offer medal ceremonies to athletes affected by Russian doping

Athletes cheated out of medals by Russian competitors at the 2014 Sochi Olympics will be offered a "dignified" medal ceremony at the PyeongChang Games in February. "We are doing from our side everything what we can to speed up this procedure," IOC president Thomas Bach says.

Those upgraded by DQ invited to PyeongChang Olympics, says president Thomas Bach

IOC president Thomas Bach said athletes who lost out on medals due to those disqualified for doping will be feted at medal ceremonies during the upcoming Winter Olympics. (Laurent Gillieron/AFP/Getty Images)

Athletes cheated out of medals by Russian competitors at the 2014 Sochi Olympics will be offered a "dignified" medal ceremony at the PyeongChang Games in February.

"We are doing from our side everything what we can to speed up this procedure," International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach said on Wednesday, one day after announcing punishments for Russian doping violations at Sochi.

Hours earlier, the Court of Arbitration for Sport said it registered appeals by 22 Russians against their disqualifications from the Sochi Games for their part in the state-backed conspiracy.

Bach said any athletes upgraded in their event by the disqualification of a Russian would be invited to the Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, which open Feb. 9 to "enjoy the games for a couple of days."

"Then we are planning again together with the IOC athletes commission to organize dignified medal ceremonies," the Olympic president told a news conference.

Request for verdicts before Games begin

Bach, a former head of the CAS appeals division, said the IOC was ready to "bundle some of these cases" to speed the process.

The court said the Russian athletes have also requested verdicts before the Pyeongchang Games open Feb. 9.

If cleared, some athletes could be eligible to compete in South Korea, if approved by an IOC-created panel which is deciding which Russians to invite.

The IOC created the panel Tuesday after formally banning the Russian Olympic committee from sending a team to Pyeongchang. Instead, it will invite Russian athletes who were never banned for doping and have undergone stricter testing controls since April.

The 22 athletes are also challenging their life bans from the Olympics. They include Sochi gold medalists Alexander Zubkov, Alexander Legkov and Aleksander Tretiakov, whose victories are among the 11 Sochi medals so far stripped from Russia in an ongoing series of disciplinary cases. Bach said other options for wronged athletes to receive their medals would be ceremonies at the Olympic Museum in Lausanne or at a major sporting event.

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