Just like last season, the coveted yellow bib is almost promised to Canadian moguls skiers.

Canadians Mikaël Kingsbury and Chloe Dufour-Lapointe lead the rankings heading into the last moguls World Cup event of the season in Moscow, Russia.

The 23-year-old Kingsbury, from Deux-Montagnes, Que., sits comfortably in first place with 605 points, over 200 points ahead of second-ranked skier Matt Graham from Australia.

The women's race for the Crystal Globe is a little more interesting.

Sister versus sister

Montreal's Chloe and Justine Dufour-Lapointe head into Moscow's event ranked top two, separated by just nine points. Chloe sits in first with 458 points while Justine is second with 449 points. Neither sister has won a Crystal Globe before. 

The 2016 season had a different feel for the Dufour-Lapointe sisters with the retirement of Hannah Kearney. The American dominated women's moguls for many years with two Olympic medals, eight world championships medals, 10 World Cup Crystal Globes and 46 world cup victories.

With their biggest competitor out of the circuit, both Chloe, 24, and Justine, 21, knew going into the season that they would become one another's biggest challengers.

"I think it's going to be at the top of our minds that each one of us wants the Crystal Globe," Chloe told CBC Sports at the beginning of the season. "I think there's maybe more of a chance this year."

She was right; this season saw Chloe on the podium six times while Justine had four top-three finishes. 

But going head-to-head in major competitions is not new for the sisters. The two competed against one another at the women's moguls final at the Sochi Winter Games where Chloe claimed silver and Justine walked away with gold.

Unpredictable competition

CBC Sports moguls analyst and former Olympian Jennifer Heil expects to see a bizarre competition this weekend.

In addition to the Dufour-Lapointe showdown, this World Cup is in an interesting location which may change the type of skiing usually seen at a dual moguls event. The hill is in downtown Moscow and made largely of scaffolding with half the length of a normal course.

"This course will be a jumping course because there's virtually no moguls," Heil told CBC Sports. "But here you want to do the tricks that you can do at full speed.

"So I think we'll probably see more high degree of difficulty tricks than we're used to seeing in dual moguls. Usually people downgrade, but I think they'll at least uphold their normal level of tricks only because it will have such an emphasis on the outcome here."

Heil already expects an interesting competition as dual moguls typically bring the unexpected. But she can't decide who between Chloe and Justine has the edge for the yellow bib.

"Justine loves to compete, she's incredibly good under pressure," said Heil. "Chloe is one of the best technicians and more calculated.

"It's almost impossible for me to tell."