Jessica Dube and Bryce Davison won't compete at this year's Skate Canada International. ((Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press))

The injury that will keep Canadian pairs team Bryce Davison and Jessica Dube out of Skate Canada International will cost them considerably more than just training time.

The former world bronze medallists were favourites to win at Skate Canada but withdrew Monday after Davison injured his knee last week training in Toronto.

Their withdrawal means missing out on Grand Prix prize money that's a key part of a skater's annual training budget.

"It definitely hurts them financially," said William Thompson, Skate Canada's CEO. "Not only are they out of [Skate Canada], they'd have a good chance in their second (Grand Prix), and then they're also giving up prize money from the Final."

The prize money for each Grand Prix is $18,000 US for first place, split between skaters in the case of pairs or ice dance. Silver medallists share $13,000, with $9,000 awarded for bronze.

Skaters are appointed to two of six Grand Prix events with the top six in each event advancing to the Grand Prix Final. Prize money for the final is $25,000 for first, $18,000 for second and $12,000 for third.

Because Davison, from Huntsville, Ont., and Dube, from St-Cyrille-de-Wendover, Que., have to skip one of their Grand Prixs event, they're ineligible to compete at the Final.

"This is obviously not the way we wanted to start our season. Our training had been going really well, and we were looking forward to competing at home at Skate Canada International," Davison said in a statement.

The defending Canadian champions are scheduled to compete at the Rostelecom Cup next month.

Davison injured his knee last week training in Toronto and had an MRI on Friday. He was expecting results Monday evening or Tuesday morning.

"There's a couple of blessings," said Thompson. "One, it's not last year [Olympics]. And two, the replacement team was ready to go, and are close by, it's easy to get them in."

Dube and Davison will be replaced by Kirsten Moore-Towers and Dylan Moscovitch of Waterloo, Ont., fifth-place finishers at the 2010 Canadian championships.

Dube and Davison's withdrawal comes days after Canada's Olympic and world ice dance champions Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir announced they wouldn't compete at Skate Canada in Kingston, Ont. Virtue recently underwent surgery on both legs to alleviate chronic pain in her shins.

"Tessa and Scott was hard, but we kind of knew it was coming, there were choices to be made and you just make the best choices you can," Thompson said on Virtue's surgery. "Bryce's injury was just, bang, out of the blue."

Joannie Rochette isn't competing on this season's Grand Prix circuit as she ponders her skating future. The Canadian won Olympic bronze in Vancouver days after the death of her mother.

The withdrawals leaves Patrick Chan of Toronto as the only reigning Canadian champion competing at Skate Canada.