Kjetil Jansrud won a men's World Cup super-G on Sunday, while fellow Norwegian Aleksander Aamodt Kilde took the lead in the discipline standings.

With only the season-ending race on Thursday remaining, Kilde has 335 points, followed by Norwegian teammate Aksel Lund Svindal on 310, Vincent Kriechmayr of Austria on 298, and Jansrud on 295. Svindal ended his season after knee surgery in January and is not a contender for the title anymore.

With a win worth 100 points, Andrew Weibrecht of the United States (91 points behind) and Carlo Janka of Switzerland (92) are also in with a mathematical chance.

"It's always fun when it's close until the end," said Jansrud, who won Sunday's race by a 0.17-second margin over Kriechmayr.

Dominik Paris of Italy, who won the downhill here on Saturday, trailed by 0.32 in third, and Kilde was 0.47 back in fourth.

Canada's Erik Guay cracked the top-10, coming in 0.90 behind Jansrud for an eighth-place result. Teammate Manuel Osborne-Paradis was 20th. 

It was Jansrud's 14th career win and sixth in super-G, just hours after he had a pair of skis stolen from his hotel.

"Someone took my warmup skis," he said. "It's a shame. We travel to various countries and they get stolen in Norway."

It didn't put the Norwegian off. He was in front of then-leader Kriechmayr at every split time and looked solid from top to bottom.

"A perfect run doesn't exist," the winner said. "But if you look at the others, you see it was a difficult race so for today it was a good run."

The last five super-G races on Norwegian soil have all been won by the home nation after Jansrud also triumphed here in 2012, 2014 and 2015, and Svindal in 2013.

Norway matched Switzerland's total of 33 super-G wins, and only Austria has won more races in the discipline — 73.

A day after the Austrian speed team suffered its worst downhill result in seven years with Klaus Kroell in 15th its best finisher, Kriechmayr bounced back with his third career podium finish.

"There was no frustration involved," said the Austrian, who also came runner-up to Jansrud here a year ago. "The downhill was very bad but I knew things are different for me in super-G. I am proud I could show that again today."

The only non-Norwegian in the top four, Kriechmayr needs to make up 37 points on leader Kilde to have a shot at his first crystal globe.

"It's a tense final," he said. "I'll need a very good run and need some help from the others. It's doable but I have to focus on myself, not on the globe."

Sunday's race was the last for American Marco Sullivan, who announced his retirement on Facebook hours after Saturday's downhill.

"I depart with a lifetime of memories and the fulfillment of my childhood dream to be one of the fastest ski racers in the world," said Sullivan, who turns 36 next month. "I am beyond grateful to everybody who has helped and inspired me along the way."

In a 15-year World Cup career, Sullivan competed in more downhills — 105 — than any other American skier. He clinched his sole victory in Chamonix, France, in 2008 and had three more podiums, most recently in Lake Louise, Alberta, three seasons ago. The World Cup finals in St. Moritz, Switzerland, start Tuesday with a training session for Wednesday's downhill.

With files from CBC Sports